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Spillovers from Systemic Bank Defaults


  • Mark Mink
  • Jakob de Haan


We examine to what extent banks’ stock market values during the 2007-2012 financial crisis were driven by increases in the default risk of banks designated as globally systemically important by the Financial Stability Board. We find that bank market values hardly respond to changes in the default risk of individual systemic banks. Together, however, changes in systemic banks’ default risk explain a substantial part of changes in other banks’ market values. This result is robust across several sub-samples, using both credit default swap spreads and Moody’s expected default frequencies as indicators of default risk.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Mink & Jakob de Haan, 2014. "Spillovers from Systemic Bank Defaults," CESifo Working Paper Series 4792, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_4792

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Wagner, Wolf, 2008. "The homogenization of the financial system and financial crises," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 330-356, July.
    7. Mink, Mark & de Haan, Jakob, 2013. "Contagion during the Greek sovereign debt crisis," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 102-113.
    8. Merton, Robert C, 1974. "On the Pricing of Corporate Debt: The Risk Structure of Interest Rates," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 29(2), pages 449-470, May.
    9. Freixas, Xavier & Parigi, Bruno M & Rochet, Jean-Charles, 2000. "Systemic Risk, Interbank Relations, and Liquidity Provision by the Central Bank," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 32(3), pages 611-638, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maarten van Oordt & Chen Zhou, 2015. "Systemic risk of European banks: Regulators and markets," DNB Working Papers 478, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    2. Belke, Ansgar & Gros, Daniel, 2015. "Banking Union as a Shock Absorber," Ruhr Economic Papers 548, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    3. Ansgar Belke & Daniel Gros, 2015. "Banking Union as a Shock Absorber," Ruhr Economic Papers 0548, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    4. repec:zbw:rwirep:0548 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    systemic banks; spillovers; global financial crisis; financial regulation;

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation


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