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Intergroup Contact and Exposure to Information about Immigrants: Experimental Evidence

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  • Patrick Dylong
  • Silke Uebelmesser

Abstract

We examine the relationship between beliefs about and attitudes towards immigrants and intergroup contact between natives and migrants in eastern Germany, a region characterized by anti-immigrant sentiment. Using probability-based survey data, we randomly vary respondents’ access to a signal about the true size of the immigrant population in the region. Respondents who receive the signal show more supportive attitudes toward immigration, with effect sizes being more pronounced for attitudes toward high-skilled immigrants. Importantly, estimating conditional average treatment effects shows that respondents who have less contact with immigrants prior to our intervention respond more strongly to the treatment. Additional findings suggest that the level of intergroup contact and biased beliefs about immigrants are complementary targets for information campaigns on immigration.

Suggested Citation

  • Patrick Dylong & Silke Uebelmesser, 2023. "Intergroup Contact and Exposure to Information about Immigrants: Experimental Evidence," CESifo Working Paper Series 10808, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_10808
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    Cited by:

    1. Patrick Dylong & Silke Übelmesser, 2024. "Vorbehalte gegenüber Zuwanderung: Die Rolle von Kontakten und Informationen," ifo Dresden berichtet, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 31(01), pages 17-23, February.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    beliefs about immigrants; immigration attitudes; intergroup contact; information campaign;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C90 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - General
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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