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Agglomeration and Economic Development: Import Substitution versus Trade Liberalisation

  • Diego Puga
  • Anthony J. Venables

This paper analyses a model of economic development in which international inequalities in the location of industry and income are supported by the agglomeration of industry in a subset of countries. Economic development may not be a gradual process of convergence by all countries, but instead involve countries moving sequentially from the group of poor countries to the group of rich countries. The role of trade policy in promotion industrialization is studied. While both import substitution and unilateral trade liberalisation may be 'successful' in attracting industry, they attract different sectors and welfare levels are higher under trade liberalisation.

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Paper provided by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE in its series CEP Discussion Papers with number dp0377.

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Date of creation: Nov 1997
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Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0377
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  1. Diego Puga & Tony Venables, 1995. "Preferential trading arrangements and industrial location," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2151, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Murphy, Kevin M. & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W., 1989. "Industrialization and the Big Push," Scholarly Articles 3606235, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  3. Paul Krugman & Anthony J. Venables, 1995. "Globalization and the Inequality of Nations," NBER Working Papers 5098, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Scotchmer, Suzanne & Thisse, Jacques-Francois, 1992. "Space and Competition: A Puzzle," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 269-86, September.
  5. Diego Puga, 1996. "The Rise and Fall of Regional Inequalities," CEP Discussion Papers dp0314, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  6. Dixit, Avinash K & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1977. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 297-308, June.
  7. Syrquin, M. & Chenery, H.B., 1989. "Patterns Of Development, 1950 To 1983," World Bank - Discussion Papers 41, World Bank.
  8. Lluch, Constantino & Powell, Alan, 1975. "International comparisons of expenditure patterns," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 275-303, July.
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