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Foreign Direct Investment

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  • J Hatzius

Abstract

This paper argues that the liberalisation of foregin direct investment (FDI) has made labour costs more important to domestic investment and long-run labour demand. It provides evidence from British and German data that is consistent with this view. First, high unit labour costs increase FDI outflows and lower FDI inflows. Second, the effect of unit labour costs on domestic manufacturing investment was more negative in the high-FDI 1980s than in the low-FDI 1970s, and this change was concentrated in high-FDI industries. The implied effect on long-run labour demand is substantial.

Suggested Citation

  • J Hatzius, 1997. "Foreign Direct Investment," CEP Discussion Papers dp0336, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0336
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dinenis, Elias & Funke, Michael, 1994. "Factor Prices, Employment and Investment in U.K. and West German Manufacturing," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 62(4), pages 412-424, December.
    2. Martin S. Feldstein, 1995. "The Effects of Outbound Foreign Direct Investment on the Domestic Capital Stock," NBER Chapters,in: The Effects of Taxation on Multinational Corporations, pages 43-66 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Klein, Michael W. & Rosengren, Eric, 1994. "The real exchange rate and foreign direct investment in the United States : Relative wealth vs. relative wage effects," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(3-4), pages 373-389, May.
    4. Markusen, James R. & Venables, Anthony J. & Eby Konan, Denise & Zhang, Kevin H., 1996. "A Unified Treatment of Horizontal Direct Investment, Vertical Direct Investment, and the Pattern of Trade in Goods and Services," Working Paper Series 465, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    5. Pain, Nigel, 1993. "An Econometric Analysis of Foreign Direct Investment in the United Kingdom," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 40(1), pages 1-23, February.
    6. Nickell, Stephen J, 1981. "Biases in Dynamic Models with Fixed Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1417-1426, November.
    7. Denny, Kevin & Nickell, Stephen J, 1992. "Unions and Investment in British Industry," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(413), pages 874-887, July.
    8. Barrell, Ray & Pain, Nigel, 1996. "An Econometric Analysis of U.S. Foreign Direct Investment," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(2), pages 200-207, May.
    9. Bond, Stephen R & Jenkinson, Tim, 1996. "The Assessment: Investment Performance and Policy," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(2), pages 1-29, Summer.
    10. Lucas, Robert E. B., 1993. "On the determinants of direct foreign investment: Evidence from East and Southeast Asia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 391-406, March.
    11. Harris, M.N. & Matyas, L., 1996. "A Comparative Analysis of Different Estimatiors for Dynamic Panel data Models," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 4/96, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Enrico Pennings, "undated". "How to Maximize Domestic Benefits from Irreversible Foreign Investments," Working Papers 205, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    2. Adam Swain, 1998. "Governing the Workplace: The Workplace and Regional Development Implications of Automotive Foreign Direct Investment in Hungary," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(7), pages 653-671.
    3. Enrico Pennings & Carlo Altomonte, 2006. "The Hazard Rate of Foreign Direct Investment: A Structural Estimation of a Real-option Model," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(5), pages 569-593, October.
    4. Brada, Josef C. & Kutan, Ali M. & Yigit, Taner M., 2004. "The effects of transition and political instability on foreign direct investment inflows: Central Europe and the Balkans," ZEI Working Papers B 33-2004, University of Bonn, ZEI - Center for European Integration Studies.

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