IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ehl/lserod/20351.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Foreign direct investment

Author

Listed:
  • Hatzius, J.

Abstract

This paper argues that the liberalisation of foregin direct investment (FDI) has made labour costs more important to domestic investment and long-run labour demand. It provides evidence from British and German data that is consistent with this view. First, high unit labour costs increase FDI outflows and lower FDI inflows. Second, the effect of unit labour costs on domestic manufacturing investment was more negative in the high-FDI 1980s than in the low-FDI 1970s, and this change was concentrated in high-FDI industries. The implied effect on long-run labour demand is substantial.

Suggested Citation

  • Hatzius, J., 1997. "Foreign direct investment," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20351, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:20351
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/20351/
    File Function: Open access version.
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Klein, Michael W. & Rosengren, Eric, 1994. "The real exchange rate and foreign direct investment in the United States : Relative wealth vs. relative wage effects," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(3-4), pages 373-389, May.
    2. Culem, Claudy G., 1988. "The locational determinants of direct investments among industrialized countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 885-904, April.
    3. Markusen, James R. & Venables, Anthony J. & Eby Konan, Denise & Zhang, Kevin H., 1996. "A Unified Treatment of Horizontal Direct Investment, Vertical Direct Investment, and the Pattern of Trade in Goods and Services," Working Paper Series 465, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    4. Barrell, Ray & Pain, Nigel, 1996. "An Econometric Analysis of U.S. Foreign Direct Investment," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(2), pages 200-207, May.
    5. Bond, Stephen R & Jenkinson, Tim, 1996. "The Assessment: Investment Performance and Policy," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(2), pages 1-29, Summer.
    6. Pain, Nigel, 1993. "An Econometric Analysis of Foreign Direct Investment in the United Kingdom," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 40(1), pages 1-23, February.
    7. Nickell, Stephen J, 1981. "Biases in Dynamic Models with Fixed Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1417-1426, November.
    8. Lucas, Robert E. B., 1993. "On the determinants of direct foreign investment: Evidence from East and Southeast Asia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 391-406, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Enrico Pennings, "undated". "How to Maximize Domestic Benefits from Irreversible Foreign Investments," Working Papers 205, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    2. Adam Swain, 1998. "Governing the Workplace: The Workplace and Regional Development Implications of Automotive Foreign Direct Investment in Hungary," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(7), pages 653-671.
    3. Schroder, Philipp J. H., 2001. "On the speed and boundaries of structural adjustment when fiscal policy is tight," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 345-364, December.
    4. Laura Ehrlich & Ulo Kaasik & Anu Randveer, 2002. "The impact of Scandinavian economies on Estonia via foreign trade and direct investments," Bank of Estonia Working Papers 2002-4, Bank of Estonia, revised 12 Nov 2002.
    5. Carvalho, Flavia & Duysters, Geert & Costa, Ionara, 2010. "Drivers of Brazilian foreign investments – technology seeking and technology exploiting as determinants of emerging FDI," MERIT Working Papers 017, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    6. Peter Nisbet & Wayne Thomas & Stuart Barrett, 2003. "UK direct investment in the United States: a mode of entry analysis," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(3), pages 245-259.
    7. Enrico Pennings & Carlo Altomonte, 2006. "The Hazard Rate of Foreign Direct Investment: A Structural Estimation of a Real-option Model," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(5), pages 569-593, October.
    8. Brada, Josef C. & Kutan, Ali M. & Yigit, Taner M., 2004. "The effects of transition and political instability on foreign direct investment inflows: Central Europe and the Balkans," ZEI Working Papers B 33-2004, University of Bonn, ZEI - Center for European Integration Studies.
    9. Cletus C. Coughlin & Eran Segev, 2000. "Location Determinants of New Foreign-Owned Manufacturing Plants," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 323-351.
    10. Robert C. Feenstra, "undated". "Facts And Fallacies About Foreign Direct Investment," Department of Economics 98-04, California Davis - Department of Economics.
    11. Anusorn Tamajai, . "The Impact of Capital Inflows of Asian Economic Growth," Fordham Economics Dissertations, Fordham University, Department of Economics, number 2000.4.
    12. John Dunning, 2001. "The Eclectic (OLI) Paradigm of International Production: Past, Present and Future," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 173-190.
    13. Ihrig, Jane, 2000. "Multinationals' response to repatriation restrictions," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 24(9), pages 1345-1379, August.
    14. Stübben, Felix & Lackenbauer, Jörg & Wenzel, Heinz-Dieter, 2005. "Eine Dekade wirtschaftlicher Transformation in den Westbalkanstaaten: Ein Überblick," BERG Working Paper Series 53, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • G3 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:20351. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (LSERO Manager). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/lsepsuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.