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Analysis of Young Neighborhood Firms Serving Urban Minority Clients

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  • Timothy Bates
  • Alicia Robb

Abstract

This study empirically investigates Michael Porter’s hypothesis that urban minority neighborhoods offer attractive opportunities to household-oriented businesses, such as retail firms (1995). Our analysis compares the traits and performance of firms serving predominantly minority clients to those selling their products largely to clients who are nonminority whites. Controlling statistically for applicable firm and owner characteristics, our findings indicate that the minority neighborhood niche does not offer young firms an attractive set of opportunities. Relative to opportunities in the corresponding nonminority household niche and the broader regional marketplace, the neighborhood minority household market is associated with reduced business viability.

Suggested Citation

  • Timothy Bates & Alicia Robb, 2008. "Analysis of Young Neighborhood Firms Serving Urban Minority Clients," Working Papers 08-11, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:08-11
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    File URL: https://www2.census.gov/ces/wp/2008/CES-WP-08-11.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert W. Fairlie & Alicia M. Robb, 2007. "Why Are Black-Owned Businesses Less Successful than White-Owned Businesses? The Role of Families, Inheritances, and Business Human Capital," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 289-323.
    2. Ben R. Craig & William E. Jackson & James B. Thomson, 2006. "Small firm credit market discrimination, SBA-guaranteed lending, and local market economic performance," Working Paper 0613, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    3. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
    4. Luigi Guiso & Paola Sapienza & Luigi Zingales, 2004. "Does Local Financial Development Matter?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(3), pages 929-969.
    5. Michael E. Porter, 1997. "New Strategies for Inner-City Economic Development," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 11(1), pages 11-27, February.
    6. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1982. "Selection and the Evolution of Industry," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(3), pages 649-670, May.
    7. Bates, Timothy, 1990. "Entrepreneur Human Capital Inputs and Small Business Longevity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(4), pages 551-559, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Qingfang Wang & Cathy Liu, 2015. "Transnational activities of immigrant-owned firms and their performances in the USA," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 44(2), pages 345-359, February.
    2. Robert W. Fairlie & Alicia M. Robb, 2008. "Race and Entrepreneurial Success: Black-, Asian-, and White-Owned Businesses in the United States," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026206281x, January.
    3. Loren Henderson & Cedric Herring & Hayward Horton & Melvin Thomas, 2015. "Credit Where Credit is Due?: Race, Gender, and Discrimination in the Credit Scores of Business Startups," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 459-479, December.
    4. Magnus Lofstrom & Timothy Bates, 2013. "African Americans’ pursuit of self-employment," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 73-86, January.

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