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An empirical analysis of the cumulative nature of deforestation

Listed author(s):
  • Julien Wolfersberger
  • Serge Garcia
  • Philippe Delacote

Deforestation is one of the major environmental issues in developping countries and agricultural expansion is its first cause. Uqing the Forest Transition hypothesis, the aim of this paper is to improve the knowledge of the cumulative nature of deforestation. To do this, the macroeconomic factors which promote the end of the deforestation in a given country are highlighted. Then the total amount of deforestation during the development is explained.

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File URL: http://www.chaireeconomieduclimat.org/RePEc/cec/wpaper/13-03-Cahier-R-2013-03-Wolfersberger-Garcia-Delacote_v2.pdf
File Function: First version, 2013
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Chaire Economie du climat in its series Working Papers with number 1303.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: 2013
Handle: RePEc:cec:wpaper:1303
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.chaireeconomieduclimat.org

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  1. Johanna Choumert & Pascale Combes Motel & K. Herve Dakpo, 2012. "The environmental Kuznets curve for deforestation: a threatened theory? A meta-analysis," Working Papers halshs-00691863, HAL.
  2. Arcand, Jean-Louis & Guillaumont, Patrick & Jeanneney, Sylviane Guillaumont, 2008. "Deforestation and the real exchange rate," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(2), pages 242-262, June.
  3. Barbier, Edward B. & Damania, Richard & Leonard, Daniel, 2005. "Corruption, trade and resource conversion," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 276-299, September.
  4. Damette, Olivier & Delacote, Philippe, 2012. "On the economic factors of deforestation: What can we learn from quantile analysis?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2427-2434.
  5. Nguyen Van, Phu & Azomahou, Theophile, 2007. "Nonlinearities and heterogeneity in environmental quality: An empirical analysis of deforestation," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 291-309, September.
  6. Andrade de Sá, Saraly & Palmer, Charles & di Falco, Salvatore, 2013. "Dynamics of indirect land-use change: Empirical evidence from Brazil," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 65(3), pages 377-393.
  7. Damette, Olivier & Delacote, Philippe, 2011. "Unsustainable timber harvesting, deforestation and the role of certification," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(6), pages 1211-1219, April.
  8. Combes Motel, P. & Pirard, R. & Combes, J.-L., 2009. "A methodology to estimate impacts of domestic policies on deforestation: Compensated Successful Efforts for "avoided deforestation" (REDD)," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 680-691, January.
  9. Amacher, Gregory S., 2006. "Corruption: A challenge for economists interested in forest policy design," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 85-89, June.
  10. Culas, Richard J., 2012. "REDD and forest transition: Tunneling through the environmental Kuznets curve," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 44-51.
  11. Culas, Richard J., 2007. "Deforestation and the environmental Kuznets curve: An institutional perspective," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2-3), pages 429-437, March.
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