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Empirical Determinants of Government Efficiency: A study Based on Objective Indicators

Author

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  • Francisca Guedes de Oliveira

    () (Faculdade de Economia e Gestão - Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Porto)

Abstract

This paper is concerned with two things: finding an objective and easily quantifiable measure of government efficiency and testing possible determinants of such quality. As measures of government efficiency we use the ratios of infant mortality rate to health expenditures as a percentage of GDP and the ratios of drop out and illiteracy rates to education expenditures as a percentage of GDP. We assume that government efficiency in providing health and education services depends on economic, political and cultural factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Francisca Guedes de Oliveira, 2012. "Empirical Determinants of Government Efficiency: A study Based on Objective Indicators," Working Papers de Economia (Economics Working Papers) 03, Católica Porto Business School, Universidade Católica Portuguesa.
  • Handle: RePEc:cap:wpaper:032012
    as

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    File URL: http://www.feg.porto.ucp.pt/docentes/repec/WP/032012-Oliveira-Empirical_determinants_of_Government_efficiency.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. La Porta, Rafael & Lopez-de-Silanes, Florencio & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert, 1999. "The Quality of Government," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(1), pages 222-279, April.
    2. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116.
    3. António Afonso & Miguel St. Aubyn, 2004. "Non-parametric Approaches to Education and Health Expenditure Efficiency in OECD Countries," Working Papers Department of Economics 2004/01, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    4. Alejandro Gaviria & Ernesto H. Stein, 2000. "The Evolution of Urban Concentration around the World: A Panel Approach," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 1315, Inter-American Development Bank.
    5. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
    6. McCleary, Rachel & Barro, Robert, 2002. "Religion and Political Economy in an International Panel," Scholarly Articles 3221170, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    7. Albouy, David, 2006. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Investigation of the Settler Mortality Data," Center for International and Development Economics Research, Working Paper Series qt8kt576x8, Center for International and Development Economics Research, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
    8. Ales Bulir & Zuzana Brixiova, 2001. "Growth Slowdown in Bureaucratic Economic Systems; An Issue Revisited," IMF Working Papers 01/6, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Rauch, James E, 1995. "Bureaucracy, Infrastructure, and Economic Growth: Evidence from U.S. Cities during the Progressive Era," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(4), pages 968-979, September.
    10. Alberto Alesina & Reza Baqir & William Easterly, 1999. "Public Goods and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(4), pages 1243-1284.
    11. repec:hrv:faseco:30726298 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:hrv:faseco:30747160 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Paolo Mauro, 1995. "Corruption and Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(3), pages 681-712.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Francisca Guedes de Oliveira, 2016. "Government Size versus Government Efficiency in a Model of Economic Growth," Eurasian Journal of Social Sciences, Eurasian Publications, vol. 4(2), pages 38-55.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Government quality; Public good provision; Efficiency; political determinants; cultural determinants; economic determinants.;

    JEL classification:

    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General

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