IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cam/camdae/0821.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Market Design for Generation Adequacy: Healing Causes rather than Symptoms

Author

Listed:
  • Roques, F.A.

Abstract

This paper argues that electricity market reform – particularly the need for complementary mechanisms to remunerate capacity – need to be analysed in the light of the local regulatory and institutional environment. If there is a lack of investment, the priority should be to identify the roots of the problem. The lack of demand side response, short-term reliability management procedures and uncompetitive ancillary services procurement often undermine market reflective scarcity pricing and distort long-term investment incentives. The introduction of a capacity mechanism should come as an optional supplement to wholesale and ancillary markets improvements. Priority reforms should focus on encouraging demand side responsiveness and reducing scarcity price distortions introduced by balancing and congestion management through better dialog between network engineers and market operators.

Suggested Citation

  • Roques, F.A., 2008. "Market Design for Generation Adequacy: Healing Causes rather than Symptoms," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0821, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:0821
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk/research-files/repec/cam/pdf/cwpe0821&EPRG0810.pdf
    File Function: Working Paper Version
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paul Joskow & Jean Tirole, 2006. "Retail electricity competition," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 37(4), pages 799-815, December.
    2. Finon, Dominique & Meunier, Guy & Pignon, Virginie, 2008. "The social efficiency of long-term capacity reserve mechanisms," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 202-214, September.
    3. Paul Joskow & Jean Tirole, 2007. "Reliability and competitive electricity markets," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 38(1), pages 60-84, March.
    4. Richard Green, 2004. "Did English Generators Play Cournot? Capacity withholding in the Electricity Pool," Working Papers 0410, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research.
    5. Neuhoff, Karsten & De Vries, Laurens, 2004. "Insufficient incentives for investment in electricity generations," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 253-267, December.
    6. Brunekreeft, G. & McDaniel, T., 2005. "Policy uncertainty and supply adequacy in electric power," Discussion Paper 2005-006, Tilburg University, Tilburg Law and Economic Center.
    7. Ford, Andrew, 1999. "Cycles in competitive electricity markets: a simulation study of the western United States," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(11), pages 637-658, October.
    8. Crampes , C. & Fabra , N., 2005. "The Spanish Electricity Industry: Plus ça change …," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0502, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    9. Batlle, Carlos & Vazquez, Carlos & Rivier, Michel & Perez-Arriaga, Ignacio J., 2007. "Enhancing power supply adequacy in Spain: Migrating from capacity payments to reliability options," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 4545-4554, September.
    10. Roques Fabien A. & Newbery David M. & Nuttall William J., 2005. "Investment Incentives and Electricity Market Design: the British Experience," Review of Network Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 4(2), pages 1-36, June.
    11. Peter Cramton & Steven Stoft, 2006. "The Convergence of Market Designs for Adequate Generating Capacity," Papers of Peter Cramton 06mdfra, University of Maryland, Department of Economics - Peter Cramton, revised 2006.
    12. Gert Brunekreeft, 2005. "Policy Uncertainty and Supply Adequacy in Electric Power Markets," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(1), pages 111-127, Spring.
    13. Hung-po Chao & Shmuel S Oren & Alex Papalexopoulos & Dejan J Sobajic & Robert Wilson, 2005. "Interface between Engineering and Market Operations in Restructured Electricity Markets," Levine's Bibliography 784828000000000222, UCLA Department of Economics.
    14. Oren, Shmuel S., 2005. "Generation Adequacy via Call Options Obligations: Safe Passage to the Promised Land," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 18(9), pages 28-42, November.
    15. Jean Michel Glachant & Marcelo Saguan, 2007. "An Institutional Frame to Compare Alternative Market Designs in e U Electricity Balancing," Working Papers 0701, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research.
    16. Creti, Anna & Fabra, Natalia, 2007. "Supply security and short-run capacity markets for electricity," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 259-276, March.
    17. Bidwell, Miles, 2005. "Reliability Options: A Market-Oriented Approach to Long-Term Adequacy," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 11-25, June.
    18. Roques, Fabien A. & Newbery, David M. & Nuttall, William J., 2008. "Fuel mix diversification incentives in liberalized electricity markets: A Mean-Variance Portfolio theory approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1831-1849, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Arango, Santiago & Castañeda, Jaime A. & Larsen, Erik R., 2013. "Mothballing in power markets: An experimental study," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 125-134.
    2. Nicolosi, Marco, 2010. "Wind power integration and power system flexibility-An empirical analysis of extreme events in Germany under the new negative price regime," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 7257-7268, November.
    3. Ingo Vogelsang, 2012. "Incentive Regulation, Investments and Technological Change," Chapters,in: Regulation and the Performance of Communication and Information Networks, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Crampes, Claude & Salant, David, 2018. "A multi-regional model of electric resource adequacy," TSE Working Papers 18-877, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    5. Olaya, Yris & Arango-Aramburo, Santiago & Larsen, Erik R., 2016. "How capacity mechanisms drive technology choice in power generation: The case of Colombia," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 563-571.
    6. repec:eee:ecolec:v:141:y:2017:i:c:p:245-260 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Ray REES & Sebastian SCHOLZ, 2010. "Electricity Market Design for Germany," Sosyoekonomi Journal, Sosyoekonomi Society, issue 2010-EN.
    8. Richard Meade & Seini O’Connor, 2011. "Comparison of Long-term Contracts and Vertical Integration in Decentralized Electricity Markets," Chapters,in: Competition, Contracts and Electricity Markets, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Grave, Katharina & Paulus, Moritz & Lindenberger, Dietmar, 2012. "A method for estimating security of electricity supply from intermittent sources: Scenarios for Germany until 203011The paper is based on a study of the Institute of Energy Economics at the University," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 193-202.
    10. Roques, Fabien & Finon, Dominique, 2017. "Adapting electricity markets to decarbonisation and security of supply objectives: Toward a hybrid regime?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 584-596.
    11. Rious, Vincent & Perez, Yannick & Roques, Fabien, 2015. "Which electricity market design to encourage the development of demand response?," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 128-138.
    12. Arango, Santiago & Larsen, Erik, 2011. "Cycles in deregulated electricity markets: Empirical evidence from two decades," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 2457-2466, May.
    13. Ringler, Philipp & Keles, Dogan & Fichtner, Wolf, 2017. "How to benefit from a common European electricity market design," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 629-643.
    14. Foster, John & Wagner, Liam & Liebman, Ariel, 2015. "Modelling the Electricity and Natural Gas Sectors for the Future Grid: Developing Co-Optimisation Platforms for Market Redesign," MPRA Paper 70114, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Dominique Finon & Fabien Roques, 2013. "European Electricity Market Reforms: The "Visible Hand" of Public Coordination," Economics of Energy & Environmental Policy, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    16. Ahmad, Salman & Mat Tahar, Razman & Muhammad-Sukki, Firdaus & Munir, Abu Bakar & Abdul Rahim, Ruzairi, 2016. "Application of system dynamics approach in electricity sector modelling: A review," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 29-37.
    17. Paulus, Moritz & Grave, Katharina & Lindenberger, Dietmar, 2011. "A methodology to estimate security of supply in electricity generation: results for Germany until 2030 given a high level of intermittent electricity feed-in," EWI Working Papers 2011-10, Energiewirtschaftliches Institut an der Universitaet zu Koeln (EWI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    electricity market; generation adequacy; market design; capacity mechanism.;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • D92 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Intertemporal Firm Choice, Investment, Capacity, and Financing
    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:0821. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jake Dyer). General contact details of provider: http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.