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Optimal equity capital requirements for Swiss G-SIBs

Author

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  • Junge, Georg
  • Kugler, Peter

    () (University of Basel)

Abstract

This paper extends the analysis of Junge and Kugler (2013) on the effects of increased capital requirements on Swiss GDP and obtains the following main results: First the Modigliani-Miller effect is robust with respect to a substantial extension of the data base and yields an offset of capital cost of 46 percent. Second, the Translog production function estimate results in a time-varying elasticity of production with respect to the price of capital between 0.34 and 0.27, which is substantially lower than the value of 0.43 found in the earlier CES framework. Third the unweighted capital (leverage) ratio for Swiss G-SIBs is approximately 6 percent for Basel III Tier1 and 4.3 percent for CET1. This corresponds to risk-weighted capital ratios of 17 to 20 percent and 13 to 15 percent, respectively. The estimates show that the recently revised Swiss Too-Big-To-Fail capital ratios for G-SIBs are about 30 percent smaller than the optimal levels. However, the oft-debated proposal to raise the equity-to-asset ratio to 20 to 30 percent is not warranted by our analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Junge, Georg & Kugler, Peter, 2017. "Optimal equity capital requirements for Swiss G-SIBs," Working papers 2017/11, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
  • Handle: RePEc:bsl:wpaper:2017/11
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    File URL: https://edoc.unibas.ch/61306/1/20180306094313_5a9e54a11a8f7.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Charles I. Jones, 2003. "Growth, capital shares, and a new perspective on production functions," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Nov.
    2. Hamada, Robert S, 1969. "Portfolio Analysis, Market Equilibrium and Corporation Finance," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 24(1), pages 13-31, March.
    3. William R. Cline, 2016. "Benefits and Costs of Higher Capital Requirements for Banks," Working Paper Series WP16-6, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    4. Smith, James, 2008. "That elusive elasticity and the ubiquitous bias: Is panel data a panacea?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 760-779, June.
    5. Georg Junge & Peter Kugler, 2013. "Quantifying the Impact of Higher Capital Requirements on the Swiss Economy," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 149(III), pages 313-356, September.
    6. James Smith, 2008. "That elusive elasticity and the ubiquitous bias: is panel data a panacea?," Bank of England working papers 342, Bank of England.
    7. Barnes, Sebastian & Price, Simon & Sebastia Barriel, Maria, 2008. "The elasticity of substitution: evidence from a UK firm-level data set," Bank of England working papers 348, Bank of England.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rudolph, Bernd, 2017. "Meilensteine der Entwicklung des Kapitalmarktes in Deutschland und der Kapitalmarkttheorie vom Ende der 1970er- bis zum Beginn der 1990er-Jahre," IBF Paper Series 16-17, IBF – Institut für Bank- und Finanzgeschichte / Institute for Banking and Financial History, Frankfurt am Main.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial regulation; Bank equity capital requirements; Capital structure; Elasticity of substitution; Translog production function;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity

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