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A Review on Energy Consumption from a Socio-Economic Perspective: Reduction through Energy Efficiency and Beyond

  • Stephan Schmidt
  • Hannes Weigt


    (University of Basel)

Abstract: Reducing energy demand and increasing energy efficiency are seen as major elements of the ongoing transformation of energy systems in multiple national and international programs like the EU 20-20-20 targets. Despite the predominately socio-economic nature of energy demand such interdisciplinary viewpoints – albeit on the rise – are still the minority within energy related research. In this paper we provide a review on energy demand both from an economics and a social science perspective. In particular, we aim to identify potential fields for combined socio-economic research efforts oriented at three questions: ‘What drives energy demand?’, ‘Why do consumers behave the way they do?’ and finally ‘How can (end user) energy consumption be influenced?’

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Paper provided by Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel in its series Working papers with number 2013/15.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:bsl:wpaper:2013/15
Contact details of provider: Postal: Peter-Merian-Weg 6, Postfach, CH-4002 Basel
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