IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bru/bruedp/05-01.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Fractional Cointegration And Aggregate Money Demand Functions

Author

Listed:
  • Guglielmo Maria Caporale

    ()

  • Luis A. Gil-Alana

Abstract

This paper examines aggregate money demand relationships in five industrial countries by employing a two-step strategy for testing the null hypothesis of no cointegration against alternatives which are fractionally cointegrated. Fractional cointegration would imply that, although there exists a long-run relationship, the equilibrium errors exhibit slow reversion to zero, i.e. that the error correction term possesses long memory, and hence deviations from equilibrium are highly persistent. It is found that the null hypothesis of no cointegration cannot be rejected for Japan. By contrast, there is some evidence of fractional cointegration for the remaining countries, i.e., Germany, Canada, the US, and the UK (where, however, the negative income elasticity which is found is not theory-consistent). Consequently, it appears that money targeting might be the appropriate policy framework for monetary authorities in the first three countries, but not in Japan or in the UK.

Suggested Citation

  • Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Luis A. Gil-Alana, 2005. "Fractional Cointegration And Aggregate Money Demand Functions," Economics and Finance Discussion Papers 05-01, Economics and Finance Section, School of Social Sciences, Brunel University.
  • Handle: RePEc:bru:bruedp:05-01
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/329/efwps/05-01.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hualde, J. & Robinson, P.M., 2007. "Root-n-consistent estimation of weak fractional cointegration," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 140(2), pages 450-484, October.
    2. Javier Hualde & Peter M. Robinson, 2002. "Root-n-Consistent Estimation of Weak Fractional Cointegration," Faculty Working Papers 08/02, School of Economics and Business Administration, University of Navarra.
    3. Hassler, Uwe & Breitung, Jörg, 2002. "A Residual-Based LM Test for Fractional Cointegration," Publications of Darmstadt Technical University, Institute for Business Studies (BWL) 37318, Darmstadt Technical University, Department of Business Administration, Economics and Law, Institute for Business Studies (BWL).
    4. Hassler, Uwe & Breitung, Jörg, 2002. "A Residual LM test for fractional cointegration," Publications of Darmstadt Technical University, Institute for Business Studies (BWL) 18287, Darmstadt Technical University, Department of Business Administration, Economics and Law, Institute for Business Studies (BWL).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Théophile T. Azomahou & Tapas Mishra & Mamata Parhi, 2015. "Economic Growth under Stochastic Population and Pollution Shocks," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 83(3), pages 314-345, June.
    2. Kumar, Saten & Webber, Don J. & Fargher, Scott, 2013. "Money demand stability: A case study of Nigeria," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 978-991.
    3. Giorgio Canarella & Luis A. Gil-Alana & Rangan Gupta & Stephen M. Miller, 2020. "Modeling US historical time-series prices and inflation using alternative long-memory approaches," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 58(4), pages 1491-1511, April.
    4. Wei Liao & Sampawende J Tapsoba, 2014. "China’s Monetary Policy and Interest Rate Liberalization; Lessons from International Experiences," IMF Working Papers 2014/075, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Kumar, Saten, 2011. "Financial reforms and money demand: Evidence from 20 developing countries," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 323-334, September.
    6. Saten Kumar & Mamta B. Chowdhury & B. Bhaskara Rao, 2013. "Demand for money in the selected OECD countries: a time series panel data approach and structural breaks," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(14), pages 1767-1776, May.
    7. Bassey Nsikan Edet & Solomon Ubong Udo & Okon Ubokudom Etim, 2017. "Modelling the Demand for Money Function in Nigeria: Is There Stability?," Bulletin of Business and Economics (BBE), Research Foundation for Humanity (RFH), vol. 6(1), pages 45-57, March.
    8. Tang, Chor Foon, 2007. "The stability of money demand function in Japan: Evidence from rolling cointegration approach," MPRA Paper 19807, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Carlos P. Barros & Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Luis A. Gil-Alana, 2014. "Long Memory in Angolan Macroeconomic Series: Mean Reversion versus Explosive Behaviour," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 26(1), pages 59-73, March.
    10. Dräger, Lena & Kolaiti, Theoplasti & Sibbertsen, Philipp, 2020. "Measuring Macroeconomic Convergence and Divergence within EMU Using Long Memory," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-675, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät, revised Feb 2021.
    11. Mouyad Alsamara & Zouhair Mrabet, 2019. "Asymmetric impacts of foreign exchange rate on the demand for money in Turkey: new evidence from nonlinear ARDL," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 335-356, April.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Javier Hualde & Peter M Robinson, 2006. "Semiparametric Estimation of Fractional Cointegration," STICERD - Econometrics Paper Series 502, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
    2. Guglielmo Caporale & Luis Gil-Alana, 2014. "Fractional integration and cointegration in US financial time series data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 47(4), pages 1389-1410, December.
    3. Robinson, P.M. & Iacone, F., 2005. "Cointegration in fractional systems with deterministic trends," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 129(1-2), pages 263-298.
    4. Gil-Alana, Luis A. & Yaya, OlaOluwa S. & Akinsomi, Omokolade & Coskun, Yener, 2020. "How do stocks in BRICS co-move with real estate stocks?," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 93-101.
    5. Yunus Emre Ergemen, 2016. "System Estimation of Panel Data Models under Long-Range Dependence," CREATES Research Papers 2016-02, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    6. Luis A. Gil‐Alana, 2003. "Testing of Fractional Cointegration in Macroeconomic Time Series," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 65(4), pages 517-529, September.
    7. Aye, Goodness C. & Carcel, Hector & Gil-Alana, Luis A. & Gupta, Rangan, 2017. "Does gold act as a hedge against inflation in the UK? Evidence from a fractional cointegration approach over 1257 to 2016," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 53-57.
    8. de Truchis, Gilles & Keddad, Benjamin, 2013. "Southeast Asian monetary integration: New evidences from fractional cointegration of real exchange rates," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 394-412.
    9. Gilles de Truchis & Elena Ivona Dumitrescu & Florent Dubois, 2019. "Local Whittle Analysis of Stationary Unbalanced Fractional Cointegration Systems," EconomiX Working Papers 2019-15, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    10. de Truchis, Gilles, 2013. "Approximate Whittle analysis of fractional cointegration and the stock market synchronization issue," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 98-105.
    11. Hualde, J. & Robinson, P.M., 2010. "Semiparametric inference in multivariate fractionally cointegrated systems," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 157(2), pages 492-511, August.
    12. Luis Gil-Alana, 2004. "The permanent income hypothesis: A new framework based on fractional integration and cointegration," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 10(3), pages 165-179, October.
    13. P. M. Robinson & M. Gerolimetto, 2006. "Instrumental variables estimation of stationary and non-stationary cointegrating regressions," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 9(2), pages 291-306, July.
    14. Cunado, J. & Gil-Alana, L. A. & Perez de Gracia, F., 2004. "Is the US fiscal deficit sustainable?: A fractionally integrated approach," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 56(6), pages 501-526.
    15. Hualde, Javier, 2006. "Unbalanced Cointegration," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(5), pages 765-814, October.
    16. Carlos Pestana Barros & Luis Gil-Alana, 2006. "Eta: A Persistent Phenomenon," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(2), pages 95-116.
    17. Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard, 2010. "Nonparametric cointegration analysis of fractional systems with unknown integration orders," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 155(2), pages 170-187, April.
    18. Marcel Aloy & Gilles Truchis, 2016. "Optimal Estimation Strategies for Bivariate Fractional Cointegration Systems and the Co-persistence Analysis of Stock Market Realized Volatilities," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 48(1), pages 83-104, June.
    19. Marcel Aloy & Gilles de Truchis, 2012. "Estimation and Testing for Fractional Cointegration," AMSE Working Papers 1215, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France.
    20. Hualde, Javier & Robinson, Peter M., 2003. "Cointegration in fractional systems with unkown integration orders," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58050, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bru:bruedp:05-01. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (John.Hunter). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.