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Long-term effects of a nutritional shock: the 1980 famine of Karamoja, Uganda

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  • Marcela UmanaAponte

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Abstract

This paper uses the 1980 famine in Karamoja, Uganda, as a natural experiment to evaluate its possible long‐lasting cognitive and health effects. Results indicate a strong negative impact on the educational attainment of adults exposed to the famine in utero or infancy. They were less likely to be literate and completed less years of education. These negative effects increase (become more negative) when controlling for family‐level unobservables. The study exploits the Ugandan 1991 and 2002 censuses provided by the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series ‐ International (IPUMS‐I) and conducted by the Uganda Bureau of Statistics. These two unique datasets allow to link the place and date of birth of individuals with the timing and regional variation of the famine.

Suggested Citation

  • Marcela UmanaAponte, 2011. "Long-term effects of a nutritional shock: the 1980 famine of Karamoja, Uganda," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/258, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  • Handle: RePEc:bri:cmpowp:11/258
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    File URL: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cmpo/publications/papers/2011/wp258.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mevlude Akbulut-Yuksel, 2014. "Children of War: The Long-Run Effects of Large-Scale Physical Destruction and Warfare on Children," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 49(3), pages 634-662.
    2. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Lindeboom, Maarten & Portrait, France, 2007. "Long-Run Longevity Effects of a Nutritional Shock Early in Life: The Dutch Potato Famine of 1846–1847," IZA Discussion Papers 3123, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    primary school; secondary school; transition; London; spatial analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • N37 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N97 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - Africa; Oceania

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