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School Choice in England: Background Facts

Author

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  • Simon Burgess
  • Adam Briggs
  • Brendon McConnell
  • Helen Slater

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Abstract

There is considerable debate on the merits of extending and strengthening school choice. In England, the controversial Education and Inspections Bill, published on the 28 February 2006, contains a prominent role for ‘school choice’. But the debate lacks some basic information on these issues, and this paper provides some background facts to fill this gap. We first consider the transport issue and ask how many pupils have choice of schools. We report the distance of school commutes for various breakdowns of LEA and school type, and for sub-groups of pupils. We also turn the question around and tabulate the proportion of pupils who have 3 schools within 2km of their home, and within 5km and 8km. The conclusion from all this is that most pupils do have considerable choice of school (as defined here). We also address a specific issue about school access ? which pupils attend their nearest school. We show that only about a half of pupils attend their nearest school, and 30% do not attend one of their nearest three schools. We investigate this to understand which pupils attend their local school, and the role played by the quality of that local school.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Burgess & Adam Briggs & Brendon McConnell & Helen Slater, 2006. "School Choice in England: Background Facts," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 06/159, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  • Handle: RePEc:bri:cmpowp:06/159
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    File URL: http://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/CMPO/workingpapers/wp159.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Harris, 2011. "The separation of lower and higher attaining pupils in the transition from primary to secondary schools: a longitudinal study of London," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/257, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    2. repec:oxf:wpaper:747 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Machin, Stephen, 2014. "Developments in economics of education research," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 13-19.
    4. Deborah Wilson & Simon Burgess & Adam Briggs, 2011. "The dynamics of school attainment of England’s ethnic minorities," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(2), pages 681-700, April.
    5. Silva, Olmo, 2009. "Some Remarks on the Effectiveness of Primary Education Interventions," IZA Policy Papers 5, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Ruth Lupton & Stephanie Thomson, 2017. "The Effects of English Secondary School System Reforms (2002-2014) on Pupil Sorting and Social Segregation: A Greater Manchester Case Study," CASE - Social Policy in a Cold Climate Working Paper 24, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    7. Jessica Ristell & Mohammed Quddus & Marcus Enoch & Chao Wang & Peter Hardy, 2013. "Quantifying the transport-related impacts of parental school choice in England," Transportation, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 69-90, January.
    8. Gibbons, Stephen & Silva, Olmo, 2008. "Urban density and pupil attainment," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 631-650, March.
    9. Allen, Rebecca & Burgess, Simon, 2013. "Evaluating the provision of school performance information for school choice," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 175-190.
    10. Herresthal, C., 2017. "Performance-Based Rankings and School Quality," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1754, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    11. Francesca Foliano & Francis Green & Marcello Sartarelli, 2017. "Can Talented Pupils with Low Socio-economic Status Shine? Evidence from a Boarding School," Working Papers. Serie AD 2017-05, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    12. Stephen Machin & Olmo Silva, 2013. "School Structure, School Autonomy and the Tail," CEP Special Papers 29, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    13. Schneider, Kerstin & Schuchart, Claudia & Weishaupt, Horst & Riedel, Andrea, 2012. "The effect of free primary school choice on ethnic groups — Evidence from a policy reform," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 430-444.
    14. Stephen Gibbons & Stephen Machin, 2008. "Valuing school quality, better transport, and lower crime: evidence from house prices," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(1), pages 99-119, spring.
    15. Richard Harris, 2011. "“Sleepwalking towards Johannesburg”? Local measures of ethnic segregation between London’s secondary schools, 2003 – 2008/9," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/275, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    16. Burgess, Simon & Briggs, Adam, 2010. "School assignment, school choice and social mobility," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 639-649, August.
    17. Deborah Wilson, 2008. "Exit, Voice and Quality in the English Education Sector," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 08/194, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    school choice; school commute; ethnicity and education;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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