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A data mining approach for the monitoring of active labour market policies

Author

Listed:
  • Fabrizio Alboni

    () (Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna)

  • Furio Camillo

    () (Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna)

  • Giorgio Tassinari

    () (Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna)

Abstract

The paper addresses the problem of evaluation of the effectiveness of Active Labour Policies in the province of Bologna, a manufacturing district in Northern Italy, during the period 2004/2006. Using surviving analysis through Kaplan Meier filter and a new approach to propensity score computation, the Authors shows that the policies run by the Labor Market Authorities are able to compensate the disavatanges that secondary labor forces such as migrants, old age or less educated workers have in getting a job when fired. Moreover, they put new light on the transitions from temporary job to permanent jobs, and show that the probability of transitions is very low.

Suggested Citation

  • Fabrizio Alboni & Furio Camillo & Giorgio Tassinari, 2009. "A data mining approach for the monitoring of active labour market policies," Quaderni di Dipartimento 2, Department of Statistics, University of Bologna.
  • Handle: RePEc:bot:quadip:wpaper:92
    as

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    File URL: http://amsacta.cib.unibo.it/2576/1/Quaderni_2009_2_AlboniCamilloTassinari_Data.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alison L. Booth & Marco Francesconi & Jeff Frank, 2002. "Temporary Jobs: Stepping Stones Or Dead Ends?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages 189-213, June.
    2. Cahuc, Pierre & Postel-Vinay, Fabien, 2002. "Temporary jobs, employment protection and labor market performance," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 63-91, February.
    3. Guadalupe, Maria, 2003. "The hidden costs of fixed term contracts: the impact on work accidents," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 339-357, June.
    4. Bondonio, Daniele & Greenbaum, Robert T., 2007. "Do local tax incentives affect economic growth? What mean impacts miss in the analysis of enterprise zone policies," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 121-136, January.
    5. Giorgio Tassinari & Furio Camillo & Marzia Freo & Andrea Guizzardi; Caterina Liberati, 2007. "Osservatorio del mercato del lavoro della provincia di Bologna: Rapporto primo semestre 2007," Quaderni di Dipartimento 5, Department of Statistics, University of Bologna.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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