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Catching Up or Falling Behind? Income Distribution of Chinese Cities

  • Chun-Yu Ho

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Boston University)

  • Dan Li

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Boston University)

This paper analyzes the evolution of Chinese urban income distribution across space and time in post-reform era. Our results suggest no evidence on income convergence across cities during the period 1984-2003. We find that cities with comparable income level are likely to be co-located in the same region; further, cities tend to mirror the mobility of their counterparts located in the same province, but not the same region. The divergence in urban income across the nation will continue if the current economic growth pattern persists in the future.

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Paper provided by Boston University - Department of Economics in its series Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series with number WP2007-22.

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Length: 28pages
Date of creation: Mar 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bos:wpaper:wp2007-22
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