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Incoerenza Dinamica ed Autocontrollo: Proposta per un'Analisi Interdisciplinare

  • D.Dragone

In the last 25 years, a vast empirical literature has seriously challenged many assumptions on which the standard microeconomic approach is based. Inspired by this evidence, behavioural economics suggests that a research program that integrates the economic, psychological and neuroscientific literature can provide a theory of human decision-making with stronger descriptive, predictive and normative power. This interdisciplinary approach does not necessarily imply abandoning the neoclassical modelling tools and losing analytical tractability. As an example, the evolution of the economic theory on intertemporal choice is presented, showing that some standard economic assumptions can be viewed as special cases in which self-control and dynamic consistency are always guaranteed.

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Paper provided by Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna in its series Working Papers with number 549.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:bol:bodewp:549
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