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Comparing the pre-settlement risk implications of alternative clearing arrangements


  • John P Jackson
  • Mark J Manning


In recent years, there has been a marked expansion in the range of products cleared through central counterparty clearing houses, accompanied by a trend towards consolidation in the clearing infrastructure. The financial stability implications of these developments are of considerable policy interest. In this paper, we use a simulation approach to analyse, in a systematic way, the potential pre-settlement cost and risk implications of these developments. Our results point towards substantial risk-reduction benefits from multilateral clearing arrangements, arising from multilateral netting and mutualisation. The paper also examines individual incentives to join multilateral clearing arrangements. We suggest that arrangements with restricted direct participation and tiered membership may be a natural response to the uneven distribution of total pre-settlement costs when agents are of heterogeneous credit quality and it is costly to individually tailor margin.

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  • John P Jackson & Mark J Manning, 2007. "Comparing the pre-settlement risk implications of alternative clearing arrangements," Bank of England working papers 321, Bank of England.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:boeewp:321

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Herbert L. Baer & Virginia G. France & James T. Moser, 2001. "Opportunity cost and prudentiality: an analysis of collateral decisions in bilateral and multilateral settings," Working Paper Series WP-01-26, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    7. Tapking, Jens & Yang, Jing, 2006. "Horizontal and Vertical Integration in Securities Trading and Settlement," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 38(7), pages 1765-1795, October.
    8. Randall S. Kroszner, 1999. "Can the Financial Markets Privately Regulate Risk? The Development of Derivatives Clearing Houses and Recent Over-the Counter Innovations," CRSP working papers 493, Center for Research in Security Prices, Graduate School of Business, University of Chicago.
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    10. James T. Moser, 1998. "Contracting innovations and the evolution of clearing and settlement methods at futures exchanges," Working Paper Series WP-98-26, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    11. Robert R. Bliss & George G. Kaufman, 2005. "Derivatives and systemic risk: netting, collateral, and closeout," Working Paper Series WP-05-03, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    12. James T. Moser, 2002. "The immediacy implications of exchange organization," Working Paper Series WP-02-09, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    13. Simon Wells, 2004. "Financial interlinkages in the United Kingdom's interbank market and the risk of contagion," Bank of England working papers 230, Bank of England.
    14. Kroszner, Randall S, 1999. "Can the Financial Markets Privately Regulate Risk? The Development of Derivatives Clearinghouses and Recent Over-the-Counter Innovations," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 31(3), pages 596-618, August.
    15. Randall S. Kroszner, 1999. "Can the financial markets privately regulate risk? The development of derivatives clearinghouses and recent over-the-counter innovations," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 596-623.
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    1. repec:wsi:ijmpcx:v:25:y:2014:i:09:n:s0129183114500351 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Kahn, Charles M. & Roberds, William, 2009. "Why pay? An introduction to payments economics," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 1-23, January.
    3. Galbiati, Marco & Soramäki, Kimmo, 2012. "Clearing networks," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 83(3), pages 609-626.
    4. Neuner, Stefan & Schäfer, Klaus, 2011. "Zentrale Gegenparteien für den außerbörslichen Derivatehandel in der Praxis," Bayreuth Working Papers on Finance, Accounting and Taxation (FAcT-Papers) 2011-02, University of Bayreuth, Chair of Finance and Banking.
    5. Garratt, Rodney, 2016. "Centralized netting in financial networks," University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series qt79t1q6cg, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara.

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