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Identifying the Average Treatment Effect in a Two Threshold Model

  • Arthur Lewbel

    ()

    (Boston College)

  • Thomas Tao Yang

    (Boston College)

Assume individuals are treated if a latent variable, containing a continuous instrument, lies between two thresholds. We place no functional form restrictions on the latent errors. Here unconfoundedness does not hold and identification at infinity is not possible. Yet we still show nonparametric point identification of the average treatment effect. We provide an associated root-n consistent estimator. We apply our model to reinvestigate the inverted-U relationship between competition and innovation, estimating the impact of moderate competitiveness on innovation without the distributional assumptions required by previous analyses. We find no evidence of an inverted-U in US data.

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Paper provided by Boston College Department of Economics in its series Boston College Working Papers in Economics with number 825.

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Date of creation: 01 Jul 2013
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Handle: RePEc:boc:bocoec:825
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  1. Imbens, Guido W. & Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 2008. "Recent Developments in the Econometrics of Program Evaluation," IZA Discussion Papers 3640, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Arthur Lewbel, 2000. "Endogenous Selection Or Treatment Model Estimation," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 462, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 13 Jun 2007.
  3. Bo E. Honore & Arthur Lewbel, 2002. "Semiparametric Binary Choice Panel Data Models Without Strictly Exogeneous Regressors," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(5), pages 2053-2063, September.
  4. Marianne P. Bitler & Jonah B. Gelbach & Hilary W. Hoynes, 2006. "What Mean Impacts Miss: Distributional Effects of Welfare Reform Experiments," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(4), pages 988-1012, September.
  5. Eric Gautier & Stefan Hoderlein, 2012. "A Triangular Treatment Effect Model With Random Coefficients In The Selection Equation," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 838, Boston College Department of Economics.
  6. Howitt, Peter & Griffith, Rachel & Aghion, Philippe & Blundell, Richard & Bloom, Nick, 2005. "Competition and Innovation: An Inverted-U Relationship," Scholarly Articles 4481507, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  7. Revenga, Ana L, 1992. "Exporting Jobs? The Impact of Import Competition on Employment and Wages in U.S. Manufacturing," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(1), pages 255-84, February.
  8. Arthur Lewbel, 1998. "Semiparametric Latent Variable Model Estimation with Endogenous or Mismeasured Regressors," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(1), pages 105-122, January.
  9. James J. Heckman & Sergio Urzua & Edward Vytlacil, 2006. "Understanding Instrumental Variables in Models with Essential Heterogeneity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(3), pages 389-432, August.
  10. Yingying Dong & Arthur Lewbel, 2004. "A Simple Estimator for Binary Choice Models with Endogenous Regressors," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 604, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 15 Jun 2012.
  11. David Card & Alan B. Krueger, 1993. "Minimum Wages and Employment: A Case Study of the Fast Food Industry in New Jersey and Pennsylvania," NBER Working Papers 4509, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Shakeeb Khan & Elie Tamer, 2010. "Irregular Identification, Support Conditions, and Inverse Weight Estimation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 78(6), pages 2021-2042, November.
  13. Aamir Rafique Hashmi, 2011. "Competition and Innovation: The Inverted-U Relationship Revisited," Departmental Working Papers wp1101, National University of Singapore, Department of Economics.
  14. Meyer, Bruce D & Viscusi, W Kip & Durbin, David L, 1995. "Workers' Compensation and Injury Duration: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 322-40, June.
  15. Marianne Bertrand, 1999. "From the Invisible Handshake to the Invisible Hand? How Import Competition Changes the Employment Relationship," NBER Working Papers 6900, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Arthur Lewbel & Yingying Dong & Thomas Tao Yang, 2012. "Viewpoint: Comparing features of convenient estimators for binary choice models with endogenous regressors," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 45(3), pages 809-829, August.
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