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The value of repeat lending

Author

Listed:
  • Blaise Gadanecz
  • Alper Kara
  • Philip Molyneux

Abstract

The unique structure of syndicated lending results in information asymmetries within the lending syndicate between banks of varying degrees of seniority. While previous studies have attempted to use indirect proxy measures to capture the effects of such information asymmetries, in this paper we propose a more direct measure. This offers new insights into how junior and senior banks rely on their own and each other's information sets in lending syndicates. In particular, we look at the previous number of borrowing/lending relationships between individual borrowers and lenders and the duration of these interactions. Using this new, direct and explicit measure on a sample of 5,842 syndicated loan transactions between 1993 and 2006, we find that when participant banks have information inferiority in the syndicate they require higher loan spreads to compensate for this asymmetry. This is amplified when the borrowers are more opaque. We thus show how junior participant banks with repeat relationships with the same borrower graduate from uniformed to informed lenders (the spread goes down as asymmetry diminishes) and how they rely both on the arranger's reputation and their own repeat experience with the borrower.

Suggested Citation

  • Blaise Gadanecz & Alper Kara & Philip Molyneux, 2011. "The value of repeat lending," BIS Working Papers 350, Bank for International Settlements.
  • Handle: RePEc:bis:biswps:350
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dennis, Steven A. & Mullineaux, Donald J., 2000. "Syndicated Loans," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 404-426, October.
    2. Focarelli, Dario & Pozzolo, Alberto Franco & Casolaro, Luca, 2008. "The pricing effect of certification on syndicated loans," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 335-349, March.
    3. Champagne, Claudia & Kryzanowski, Lawrence, 2007. "Are current syndicated loan alliances related to past alliances?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(10), pages 3145-3161, October.
    4. Ugo Albertazzi & Ginette Eramo & Leonardo Gambacorta & Carmelo Salleo, 2011. "Securitization is not that evil after all," BIS Working Papers 341, Bank for International Settlements.
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    6. Campbell, Tim S & Kracaw, William A, 1980. " Information Production, Market Signalling, and the Theory of Financial Intermediation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 35(4), pages 863-882, September.
    7. de Haas, Ralph & van Horen, Neeltje, 2009. "The strategic behavior of banks during a financial crisis; evidence from the syndicated loan market," MPRA Paper 14164, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Esty, Benjamin C. & Megginson, William L., 2003. "Creditor Rights, Enforcement, and Debt Ownership Structure: Evidence from the Global Syndicated Loan Market," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 38(01), pages 37-60, March.
    9. Kamphol Panyagometh & Gordon S. Roberts, 2010. "Do Lead Banks Exploit Syndicate Participants? Evidence from Ex Post Risk," Financial Management, Financial Management Association International, vol. 39(1), pages 273-299, March.
    10. Ivashina, Victoria, 2009. "Asymmetric information effects on loan spreads," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(2), pages 300-319, May.
    11. Berger, Allen N & Udell, Gregory F, 1995. "Relationship Lending and Lines of Credit in Small Firm Finance," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 68(3), pages 351-381, July.
    12. Ingo Fender & Janet Mitchell, 2009. "The future of securitisation: how to align incentives," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, September.
    13. Boot, Arnoud W. A., 2000. "Relationship Banking: What Do We Know?," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 7-25, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Howcroft, Barry & Kara, Alper & Marques-Ibanez, David, 2014. "Determinants of syndicated lending in European banks and the impact of the financial crisis," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 473-490.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    syndicated loans; repetitive lending; arranger opportunistic behaviour; arranger reputation; opaque borrowers;

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