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Hiring incentives and/or firing cost reduction? Evaluating the impact of the 2015 policies on the Italian labour market

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  • Paolo Sestito

    () (Bank of Italy)

  • Eliana Viviano

    () (Bank of Italy)

Abstract

In 2015 Italy adopted two different policies aimed at reducing labour market dualism and fostering employment: a generous permanent hiring subsidy and new regulations lowering firing costs and making them less uncertain. Using microdata for Veneto and exploiting some differences in the design of the policies, we evaluate the impact of each measure. Both contributed to double the monthly rate of conversion of fixed-term jobs into permanent positions. Moreover, around 40 per cent of new total gross hires with permanent job contracts occurred because of the incentives, whereas 5 per cent can be attributed to the new firing regulations . The new firing rules also made firms less reluctant to offer permanent job positions to yet untested workers. The possibility of benefitting from the incentives in case of a conversion also boosted temporary hiring, as it allowed firms to test for the quality of a job match.

Suggested Citation

  • Paolo Sestito & Eliana Viviano, 2016. "Hiring incentives and/or firing cost reduction? Evaluating the impact of the 2015 policies on the Italian labour market," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 325, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdi:opques:qef_325_16
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    File URL: http://www.bancaditalia.it/pubblicazioni/qef/2016-0325/QEF_325_16.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Guerrazzi, Marco & Ksebi, Ilham, 2018. "Measuring unemployment by means of official data and administrative records: Empirical and theoretical perspectives," MPRA Paper 87227, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Dino Pinelli & Roberta Torre & Lucianajulia Pace & Laura Cassio & Alfonso Arpaia, 2017. "The Recent Reform of the Labour Market in Italy: A Review," European Economy - Discussion Papers 2015 - 072, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    3. Pietro Ichino, 2016. "Last Labour Reforms in Italy," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 14(3), pages 52-58, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    job creation; firing costs; hiring incentives; labour market reforms;

    JEL classification:

    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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