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Capital Flows to Developing Countries: Is There an Allocation Puzzle?

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  • Josef Schroth

Abstract

Foreign direct investment inflows are positively related to growth across developing countries—but so are savings in excess of investment. I develop an explanation for this well-established puzzle by focusing on the limited availability of consumer credit in developing countries together with general equilibrium effects. In my model, fast-growing developing countries increase their holdings of safe assets, which creates net capital outflows despite inflows of foreign direct investment. The world risk-free interest rate falls as a result, and slow-growing developing countries reduce their holdings of safe assets, which creates net capital inflows despite outflows of foreign direct investment.

Suggested Citation

  • Josef Schroth, 2016. "Capital Flows to Developing Countries: Is There an Allocation Puzzle?," Staff Working Papers 16-53, Bank of Canada.
  • Handle: RePEc:bca:bocawp:16-53
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    Cited by:

    1. Hasdi Aimon & Rika Utami Restihani & Anggi Putri Kurniadi*, 2019. "The Interaction of Macroeconomic Variables on Capital Inflow in Emerging Market Countries in ASEAN: Panel Error Correction Model Approach," The Journal of Social Sciences Research, Academic Research Publishing Group, vol. 5(9), pages 1357-1364, 09-2019.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreign reserves management; Interest rates; International financial markets;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E13 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Neoclassical
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies

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