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Financial Crises and Money Demand in Jamaica


  • Fiona Atkins

    (Department of Economics, Mathematics & Statistics, Birkbeck)


This paper estimates the money demand function for Jamaica using a Structural co-integrating VAR. This approach provides estimates of the long run structural relations and also reveals the complex short run feedbacks of monetary policy on key macro variables. In recent years Jamaican governments have adopted an inflation targeting framework for policy and have moved towards reliance on interest rates rather than direct money control as the primary instrument. This policy presumes that monetary transmission runs from the interest rate to directly affect the level of output which then feeds into the inflation process. However, in an economy with limited financial sector development interest rate transmission may be more circumspect, having a strong direct affect on money demand which then influences aggregate demand and output and hence inflation. These feedbacks are investigated within the error correction model.. Stability of Money demand is vital for predictable policy, and is investigated using CUSUM tests for parameter stability. The Jamaican financial sector suffered a major crisis in the mid 1990’s, the paper considers whether the stability of money demand was compromised. It is argued that the finding of stable money demand suggests that the specific policy responses may have successfully bolstered confidence and prevented financial implosion.

Suggested Citation

  • Fiona Atkins, 2005. "Financial Crises and Money Demand in Jamaica," Birkbeck Working Papers in Economics and Finance 0512, Birkbeck, Department of Economics, Mathematics & Statistics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bbk:bbkefp:0512

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Rup Singh & Saten Kumar, 2012. "Application of the alternative techniques to estimate demand for money in developing countries," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 46(2), pages 43-63, July-Dece.
    2. Kumar, Saten, 2011. "Financial reforms and money demand: Evidence from 20 developing countries," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 323-334, September.

    More about this item


    Caribbean; Jamaica; money demand;

    JEL classification:

    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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