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Incidence, Optimal Use and Rationale of Place-Based Job Creation Programs

Author

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  • Sachiko Kazekami

    () (Chukyo University)

Abstract

First, this paper empirically evaluates the incidence of the Japanese place-based job creation program, which has been rarely studied in Japan. The program increases employment, especially in the agricultural, retail trade and service sectors that most treated cities promote. Second, this paper explores the cities that the program most affects. Those with large aging populations and those with small working age population decrease the effects of the program. Third, this paper assesses the rationale of this program and does not observe a strong reduction in sales, workers or establishments in the neighboring cities of the treated city.

Suggested Citation

  • Sachiko Kazekami, 2016. "Incidence, Optimal Use and Rationale of Place-Based Job Creation Programs," SERIES 02-2016, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza - Università degli Studi di Bari "Aldo Moro", revised Mar 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:bai:series:series_wp_02-2016
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Neumark, David & Kolko, Jed, 2010. "Do enterprise zones create jobs? Evidence from California's enterprise zone program," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 1-19, July.
    2. Claire H. Hollweg & Daniel Lederman & Diego Rojas & Elizabeth Ruppert Bulmer, 2014. "Sticky Feet : How Labor Market Frictions Shape the Impact of International Trade on Jobs and Wages," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 18777, August.
    3. Chirinko, Robert S. & Wilson, Daniel J., 2008. "State investment tax incentives: A zero-sum game?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(12), pages 2362-2384, December.
    4. Kenji Azetsu & Mototsugu Fukushige, 2009. "The estimation of asymmetric adjustment costs for the number of workers and working hours - empirical evidence from Japanese industry data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(10), pages 995-998.
    5. Anthony Briant & Miren Lafourcade & Benoît Schmutz, 2015. "Can Tax Breaks Beat Geography? Lessons from the French Enterprise Zone Experience," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 88-124, May.
    6. Freedman, Matthew, 2012. "Teaching new markets old tricks: The effects of subsidized investment on low-income neighborhoods," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(11), pages 1000-1014.
    7. David Neumark & Diego Grijalva, 2013. "The Employment Effects of State Hiring Credits During and After the Great Recession," NBER Working Papers 18928, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Anthony Briant & Miren Lafourcade & Benoît Schmutz, 2012. "Can Tax Breaks Beat Geography? Lessons from the French Enterprise Zone Experience," Working Papers halshs-00695225, HAL.
    9. Matias Busso & Jesse Gregory & Patrick Kline, 2013. "Assessing the Incidence and Efficiency of a Prominent Place Based Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(2), pages 897-947, April.
    10. Anthony Briant & Miren Lafourcade & Benoît Schmutz, 2015. "Can Tax Breaks Beat Geography? Lessons from the French Enterprise Zone Experience," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 88-124, May.
    11. Givord, Pauline & Rathelot, Roland & Sillard, Patrick, 2013. "Place-based tax exemptions and displacement effects: An evaluation of the Zones Franches Urbaines program," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 151-163.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Place-based policy; job creation; unemployment; rationale; externality effect;

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • H22 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Incidence
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies

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