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Moving through the political participation hierarchy: A focus on personal values


  • Gail Pacheco

    (Department of Economics, Faculty of Business and Law, Auckland University of Technology)

  • Barrett Owen


This study empirically explores the determinants of political participation. Using recent data from the European Social Survey (2010/2011), we investigate the relationship between political participation and personal values, via use of the Schwartz (1992) values inventory. Political activities are categorised into levels of participation (none, weak, medium, strong) based on the cost of participating and how unconventional the activity is. A generalised ordered logit model is applied, and finds that individuals that are more open to change and more self-transcendent, are more likely to participate. Furthermore, the patterns of influence (with respect to the majority of individual characteristics) are not monotonic in nature, as you rise through the levels of political participation, highlighting some key areas that future research could tackle. These findings are important for researchers and policy makers who may be interested in understanding determinants of, and/or enhancing the level of political participation in an economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Gail Pacheco & Barrett Owen, 2013. "Moving through the political participation hierarchy: A focus on personal values," Working Papers 2013-02, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:aut:wpaper:201302

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Alberto Alesina & Paola Giuliano, 2011. "Family Ties And Political Participation," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 9(5), pages 817-839, October.
    2. Mondak, Jeffery J & Halperin, Karen D, 2008. "A Framework for the Study of Personality and Political Behaviour," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 38(02), pages 335-362, April.
    3. Jan Deth, 1986. "A note on measuring political participation in comparative research," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 261-272, June.
    4. Gail Pacheco & Thomas Lange, 2010. "Political participation and life satisfaction: a cross-European analysis," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(9), pages 686-702, August.
    5. repec:aph:ajpbhl:2001:91:1:99-104_7 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Conover, Pamela Johnston & Searing, Donald D. & Crewe, Ivor M., 2002. "The Deliberative Potential of Political Discussion," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(01), pages 21-62, January.
    7. repec:cup:apsrev:v:89:y:1995:i:02:p:271-294_09 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Russell J. Dalton, 2008. "Citizenship Norms and the Expansion of Political Participation," Political Studies, Political Studies Association, vol. 56, pages 76-98, March.
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    More about this item


    personal values; political participation;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • P16 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Political Economy of Capitalism

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