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Identifying the exchange-rate balance sheet effect over firms


  • César Carrera

    (Banco Central de Reserva del Perú)


I use firm-level data on investment and evaluate the balance sheet effect of changes in the exchange rate. The fact that a depreciation not only generates an expansion (for a small open economy that exports raw materials) but also has the potential of recession (in a dollarized economy in which most firms’ liabilities are in foreign currency) brings up the question on what the final effect of a depreciation over either investment or production is. Following Bleakley and Cowan (2008), I evaluate if this channel is operating. My estimations indicates that this effect tends to disappear when terms of trade are considered, result that is robust to different specifications.

Suggested Citation

  • César Carrera, 2016. "Identifying the exchange-rate balance sheet effect over firms," Working Papers 2016-66, Peruvian Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:apc:wpaper:2016-066

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Aghion, Philippe & Bacchetta, Philippe & Banerjee, Abhijit, 2004. "A corporate balance-sheet approach to currency crises," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 119(1), pages 6-30, November.
    2. Luis Felipe Céspedes & Roberto Chang & Andrés Velasco, 2004. "Balance Sheets and Exchange Rate Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 1183-1193, September.
    3. Benavente, Jose Miguel & Johnson, Christian A. & Morande, Felipe G., 2003. "Debt composition and balance sheet effects of exchange rate depreciations: a firm-level analysis for Chile," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 397-416, December.
    4. Bonomo, Marco & Martins, Betina & Pinto, Rodrigo, 2003. "Debt composition and exchange rate balance sheet effect in Brazil: a firm level analysis," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 368-396, December.
    5. Galindo, Arturo & Panizza, Ugo & Schiantarelli, Fabio, 2003. "Debt composition and balance sheet effects of currency depreciation: a summary of the micro evidence," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 330-339, December.
    6. Paul Krugman, 1999. "Balance Sheets, the Transfer Problem, and Financial Crises," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 6(4), pages 459-472, November.
    7. Hoyt Bleakley & Kevin Cowan, 2008. "Corporate Dollar Debt and Depreciations: Much Ado About Nothing?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(4), pages 612-626, November.
    8. Aysun, Uluc & Hepp, Ralf, 2013. "Identifying the balance sheet and the lending channels of monetary transmission: A loan-level analysis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 2812-2822.
    9. Chang, Roberto & Velasco, Andres, 2000. "Financial Fragility and the Exchange Rate Regime," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 1-34, May.
    10. Samuel W. Malone, 2009. "Balance sheet effects, external volatility, and emerging market spreads," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 12, pages 273-299, November.
    11. Pratap, Sangeeta & Lobato, Ignacio & Somuano, Alejandro, 2003. "Debt composition and balance sheet effects of exchange rate volatility in Mexico: a firm level analysis," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 450-471, December.
    12. Carranza, Luis & Galdon-Sanchez, Jose E. & Gomez-Biscarri, Javier, 2011. "The relationship between investment and large exchange rate depreciations in dollarized economies," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(7), pages 1265-1279.
    13. Aghion, Philippe & Bacchetta, Philippe & Banerjee, Abhijit, 2001. "Currency crises and monetary policy in an economy with credit constraints," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(7), pages 1121-1150.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nelson R. Ramírez-Rondán, 2016. "Balance Sheet and Currency Mismatch: Evidence for Peruvian Firms," Working Papers 2016-85, Peruvian Economic Association.

    More about this item


    Balance sheet effect; exchange rate; investment;

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • G31 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Capital Budgeting; Fixed Investment and Inventory Studies

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