IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/amu/wpaper/2017-01.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Revisiting the Effect of Crude Oil Price Movements on US Stock Market Returns and Volatility

Author

Listed:
  • Ralph Sonenshine
  • Michael Cauvel

Abstract

From mid-2014 to 2016, oil prices plunged rapidly causing significant volatility in the US and global equity markets. This change in crude oil prices occurred after a significant run up in oil prices three to four years earlier. Each change in the growth trajectory of oil prices affects stock market returns. How and why do oil price shocks affect the expected stock market returns among key sectors of the economy? This paper explores this issue by examining how the magnitude of crude oil price changes affect the stock market returns and variances of key producing, banking and consuming segments of the US economy. Our findings provide some explanations for the asymmetric responses to positive and negative oil shocks found in these key sectors of the economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Ralph Sonenshine & Michael Cauvel, 2017. "Revisiting the Effect of Crude Oil Price Movements on US Stock Market Returns and Volatility," Working Papers 2017-01, American University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:amu:wpaper:2017-01
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1I1YFrUcZNReD1rv6s3HsTavs9owlKaO1
    File Function: First version, 2017
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sunil K. Mohanty & Mohan Nandha, 2011. "Oil Risk Exposure: The Case of the U.S. Oil and Gas Sector," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 46(1), pages 165-191, February.
    2. Peter Ferderer, J., 1996. "Oil price volatility and the macroeconomy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 1-26.
    3. Hamilton, James D, 1983. "Oil and the Macroeconomy since World War II," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(2), pages 228-248, April.
    4. Ross, Stephen A, 1989. " Information and Volatility: The No-Arbitrage Martingale Approach to Timing and Resolution Irrelevancy," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 44(1), pages 1-17, March.
    5. Kiseok Lee & Shawn Ni & Ronald A. Ratti, 1995. "Oil Shocks and the Macroeconomy: The Role of Price Variability," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 39-56.
    6. Bernanke, Ben S, 1983. "The Determinants of Investment: Another Look," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(2), pages 71-75, May.
    7. Chen, Nai-Fu & Roll, Richard & Ross, Stephen A, 1986. "Economic Forces and the Stock Market," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(3), pages 383-403, July.
    8. Sadorsky, Perry, 1999. "Oil price shocks and stock market activity," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 449-469, October.
    9. Hammoudeh, Shawkat & Li, Huimin, 2005. "Oil sensitivity and systematic risk in oil-sensitive stock indices," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 1-21.
    10. Nathan S. Balke & Stephen P.A. Brown & Mine K. Yucel, 2002. "Oil Price Shocks and the U.S. Economy: Where Does the Asymmetry Originate?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 27-52.
    11. Roger D. Huang & Ronald W. Masulis & Hans R. Stoll, 1996. "Energy shocks and financial markets," Journal of Futures Markets, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 1-27, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Deregulation; mergers; regulated industries; natural monopoly;

    JEL classification:

    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities
    • L98 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Government Policy
    • G34 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Mergers; Acquisitions; Restructuring; Corporate Governance
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:amu:wpaper:2017-01. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Meal). General contact details of provider: http://www.american.edu/cas/economics/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.