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GINI DP 81: The Measurement of Tracking, Vocational Orientation, and Standardization of Educational Systems: a Comparative Approach

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Educational systems differ on at least three dimensions: the timing and form of tracking of students, the extent to which a system provides vocationally specific skills, and the extent to which an educational system is standardized nationwide. Existing conceptualizations of these three dimensions are rather fragmented, and in this article we develop new indicators for a large number of countries, based on various sources of data (OECD, UNESCO, TIMSS, PISA and Eurydice). With our new indicators we examine the relationship between the three dimensions of educational systems and four core functions of schooling: equality of opportunity, the optimization of students’ skills, the allocation of students to the labor market, and the preparation for active participation in society at large.

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  • Thijs Bol & Herman Werfhorst, 2013. "GINI DP 81: The Measurement of Tracking, Vocational Orientation, and Standardization of Educational Systems: a Comparative Approach," GINI Discussion Papers 81, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:aia:ginidp:81
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    1. Eric A. Hanushek & Ludger Wössmann, 2006. "Does Educational Tracking Affect Performance and Inequality? Differences- in-Differences Evidence Across Countries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(510), pages 63-76, March.
    2. Thomas Fuchs & Ludger Wößmann, 2008. "What accounts for international differences in student prformance? A re-examination using PISA data," Studies in Empirical Economics, in: Christian Dustmann & Bernd Fitzenberger & Stephen Machin (ed.), The Economics of Education and Training, pages 209-240, Springer.
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    4. Eric A. Hanushek & Ludger Wössmann, 2006. "Does Educational Tracking Affect Performance and Inequality? Differences- in-Differences Evidence Across Countries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(510), pages 63-76, March.
    5. Bishop, J., 1997. "The Effect of national Standards and Curriculum-Based Exams on Achievement," Papers 97-01, Cornell - Center for Advanced Human Resource Studies.
    6. Stephen Nickell, 1997. "Unemployment and Labor Market Rigidities: Europe versus North America," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 55-74, Summer.
    7. Eric A. Hanushek & Margaret E. Raymond, 2004. "The Effect of School Accountability Systems on the Level and Distribution of Student Achievement," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 2(2-3), pages 406-415, 04/05.
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    1. Wise, Ramsey, 2015. "Does market-oriented education systems improve performance or increase inequality: A configurational comparative method for understanding (un)intended educational outcomes," TranState Working Papers 189, University of Bremen, Collaborative Research Center 597: Transformations of the State.
    2. Sönke Hendrik Matthewes, 2018. "Better Together? Heterogeneous Effects of Tracking on Student Achievement," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1775, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Pessino, Carola & Izquierdo, Alejandro & Vuletin, Guillermo, 2018. "Better Spending for Better Lives: How Latin America and the Caribbean Can Do More with Less," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 9152, May.
    4. Gerlinde Verbist & Francesco Figari, 2013. "GINI DP 88: The redistributive effect and progressivity of taxes revisited: An International Comparison across the European Union," GINI Discussion Papers 88, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    5. Healy, D. & Mulcahy, A. & O'Donnnell, I., 2013. "GINI DP 93: Crime, Punishment and Inequality in Ireland," GINI Discussion Papers 93, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    6. Smyth, Emer, 2017. "Working at a different level? Curriculum differentiation in Irish lower secondary education," Papers WP568, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).

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