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Low Skill Employment and the Changing Economy of Rural America

Author

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  • Gibbs, Robert
  • Kusmin, Lorin D.

Abstract

This study reports trends in rural low-skill employment in the 1990s and their impact on the rural workforce. The share of rural jobs classified as low-skill fell by 2.2 percentage points between 1990 and 2000, twice the decline of the urban low-skill employment share, but much less than the decline of the 1980s. Employment shifts from low-skill to skilled occupations within industries, rather than changes in industry mix, explain virtually all of the decline in the rural low-skill employment share. The share decline was particularly large for rural Black women, many of whom moved out of low-skill blue-collar work into service occupations, while the share of rural Hispanics who held low-skill jobs increased.

Suggested Citation

  • Gibbs, Robert & Kusmin, Lorin D., 2005. "Low Skill Employment and the Changing Economy of Rural America," Economic Research Report 33595, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersrr:33595
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/33595
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:hoo:wpaper:e-94-11 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Timothy R. Wojan, 2000. "The Composition of Rural Employment Growth in the “New Economy”," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(3), pages 594-605.
    3. Glaeser, Edward L & Mare, David C, 2001. "Cities and Skills," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(2), pages 316-342, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Xiaodong Du & David A. Hennessy & William M. Edwards, 2007. "Determinants of Iowa Cropland Cash Rental Rates: Testing Ricardian Rent Theory," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 07-wp454, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
    2. Lambert, Dayton M. & McNamara, Kevin T. & Garrett, Megan I., 2006. "Food Industry Investment Flows: Implications for Rural Development," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 36(2), pages 140-162.
    3. Anderson, Cynthia D. & Goe, W. Richard & Weng, Chih-Yuan, 2007. "A Multi-method Research Strategy for Understanding Change in the Rate of Working Poor in the North Central Region of the United States," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 37(3), pages 367-391.
    4. W. Richard Goe & Anirban Mukherjee, 2013. "The implications of corn-based ethanol production for non-metropolitan development in the North Central region of the US," Chapters,in: Handbook of Rural Development, chapter 12, pages i-ii Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Marre, Alexander W., 2009. "Rural Out-Migration, Income, and Poverty: Are Those Who Move Truly Better Off?," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49346, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Brian C. Briggeman, 2011. "The importance of off-farm income to servicing farm debt," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q I.

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