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Factors Associated with Farm Households’ Movement Into and Out of Poverty in Kenya: The Rising Importance of Livestock

  • Burke, William J.
  • Jayne, Thomas S.
  • Freeman, H. Ade
  • Kristjanson, Patricia

This study explores the dynamics of poverty in Kenya. The study specifically examines how initial conditions, household decisions, and other factors that may change over time affect poverty. Dynamic relationships are identified between behavioral variables, exogenous shocks at one point in time, and indicators of household welfare in subsequent years.

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Paper provided by Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics in its series Food Security International Development Working Papers with number 54563.

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Date of creation: Jan 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:midiwp:54563
Contact details of provider: Postal: Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture, 446 West Circle Dr., Rm 202, East Lansing, MI 48824-1039
Phone: (517) 355-4563
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  1. Jayne, Thomas S. & Yamano, Takashi & Weber, Michael T. & Tschirley, David L. & Benfica, Rui M.S. & Chapoto, Antony & Zulu, Ballard & Neven, David, 2002. "Smallholder Income and Land Distribution in Africa: Implications for Poverty Reduction Strategies," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses 11295, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  2. Yamano, Takashi & Jayne, Thom S., 2004. "Working-Age Adult Mortality and Primary School Attendance in Rural Kenya," Working Papers 202631, Egerton University, Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development.
  3. Jayne, Thomas S. & Yamano, Takashi & Nyoro, James K. & Awuor, Tom, 2000. "Do Farmers Really Benefit from High Food Prices? Balancing Rural Interests in Kenya's Maize Pricing and Marketing Policy," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 54641, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  4. David E. Sahn & David C. Stifel, 2003. "Urban--Rural Inequality in Living Standards in Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 12(4), pages 564-597, December.
  5. Barrett, Christopher B. & Bezuneh, Mesfin & Clay, Daniel C. & Reardon, Thomas, 2001. "Heterogeneous Contraints, Incentives, and Income Diversification Strategies in Rural Africa," Working Papers 179567, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  6. Gamba, Paul & Mghenyi, Elliot, 2004. "Rural Poverty Dynamics, Agricultural Productivity and Access to Resources," Working Papers 202622, Egerton University, Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development.
  7. World Bank, 2000. "Can Africa Claim the 21st Century?," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 22962.
  8. Reardon, Thomas, 1997. "Using evidence of household income diversification to inform study of the rural nonfarm labor market in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 735-747, May.
  9. Barrett, Christopher B. & Swallow, Brent M., 2003. "Fractal Poverty Traps," Working Papers 127794, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  10. Michael Carter & Christopher Barrett, 2006. "The economics of poverty traps and persistent poverty: An asset-based approach," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(2), pages 178-199.
  11. Kristjanson, Patricia & Krishna, Anirudh & Radeny, Maren & Nindo, W., 2004. "Pathways out of Poverty in Western Kenya and the Role of Livestock," PPLPI Working Papers 23779, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Pro-Poor Livestock Policy Initiative.
  12. Kirimi, Lilian & Sindi, Kirimi, 2006. "A Duration Analysis of Poverty Transitions in Rural Kenya," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21475, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  13. Ravallion, Martin & Datt, Gaurav, 2002. "Why has economic growth been more pro-poor in some states of India than others?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 381-400, August.
  14. Krishna, Anirudh, 2004. "Escaping Poverty and Becoming Poor: Who Gains, Who Loses, and Why?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 121-136, January.
  15. Geda, Alemayehu & Shimeles, Abebe & Zerfu, Daniel, 2006. "Finance and Poverty in Ethiopia: A Household Level Analysis," Working Paper Series RP2006/51, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
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