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Household Level Financial Incentives to Adoption of Conservation Agricultural Technologies in Africa

Author

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  • Haggblade, Steven
  • Tembo, Gelson
  • Donovan, Cynthia

Abstract

Although several studies have been conducted to determine the viability of conservation agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa, almost all such studies are fragmented – often country specific – and with undue emphasis on output effects. However, assessment of the attractiveness of these technologies in Sub-Saharan Africa requires a detailed case-by-case comparison of changes in output and input costs and benefits. This paper reviews a set of responses known collectively as “conservation” or “sustainable” agriculture. Though definitions vary, these technologies typically involve agricultural management practices that prevent degradation of soil and water resources and thereby permit sustainable farm productivity without environmental degradation.

Suggested Citation

  • Haggblade, Steven & Tembo, Gelson & Donovan, Cynthia, 2004. "Household Level Financial Incentives to Adoption of Conservation Agricultural Technologies in Africa," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54466, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:54466
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/54466/files/wp9zambia.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. S.J. Dima & A.N. Odero, 1997. "Organic Farming for Sustainable Agricultural Production. A Brief Theoretical Review and Preliminary Empirical Evidence," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 10(2), pages 177-188, September.
    2. Astatke, Abiye & Jabbar, Mohammad A. & Tanner, Douglas, 2003. "Participatory conservation tillage research: an experience with minimum tillage on an Ethiopian highland Vertisol," Research Reports 182996, International Livestock Research Institute.
    3. Jagger, Pamela & Pender, John, 2003. "The role of trees for sustainable management of less-favored lands: the case of eucalyptus in Ethiopia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 83-95, January.
    4. Abdoulaye, Tahirou & Sanders, John H., 2003. "Improving Marketing Strategies To Accelerate Technological Change For The Basic Cereal: The Niger Case," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22207, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    5. Mortimore,Michael, 1998. "Roots in the African Dust," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521451734.
    6. Haggblade, Steven & Tembo, Gelson, 2003. "Conservation farming in Zambia:," EPTD discussion papers 108, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Mortimore,Michael, 1998. "Roots in the African Dust," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521457859.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ndlovu, Patrick V. & Mazvimavi, Kizito & An, Henry & Murendo, Conrad, 2014. "Productivity and efficiency analysis of maize under conservation agriculture in Zimbabwe," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 21-31.
    2. Harris, David & Orr, Alastair, 2014. "Is rainfed agriculture really a pathway from poverty?," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 84-96.
    3. Ajayi, Olu Clifford & Akinnifesi, Festus K. & Sileshi, G. & Kanjipite, W., 2009. "Labour inputs and financial profitability of conventional and agroforestry-based soil fertility management practices in Zambia," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 0(Issue 3), pages 1-17, September.
    4. Ngoma, Hambulo & Mulenga, Brian P. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2013. "Determinants and Extent of Use of Minimum Tillage Practices among Zambian Smallholder Crop Farmers from 2008 to 2012," 2013 Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161210, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).

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