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Food Sector Transformation and Standards in Zambia: Smallholder Farmer Participation and Growth in the Dairy Sector

  • Neven, David
  • Katjiuongua, Hikuepi
  • Adjosoediro, Ingrid
  • Reardon, Thomas
  • Chuzu, Pia Nwanza
  • Tembo, Gelson
  • Ndiyoi, Mukelabai

Market liberalization in Zambia has led to a rapid and fundamental transformation of its dairy sector. Mainly through foreign direct investment and international partnerships, a new formal dairy sector, characterized by institutional, organizational and technological innovation, emerged from the ashes of abandoned government projects. Sensing the development opportunity that arose from an untapped milk supply potential in Zambia's traditional smallholder livestock production and a growing milk demand from the newly emerging formal dairy processing sector, numerous donor-funded smallholder dairy farmer support programs emerged. At the same time, in order to protect its domestic market as well as to be in a better position to enter demanding export markets, stakeholders from the private, public and NGO sector have recently joined forces to develop technical dairy product standards for Zambia based on the CODEX.

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Paper provided by Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics in its series Staff Papers with number 11701.

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Date of creation: 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:midasp:11701
Contact details of provider: Postal: Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture, 446 West Circle Dr., Rm 202, East Lansing, MI 48824-1039
Phone: (517) 355-4563
Fax: (517) 432-1800
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  1. Reardon, Thomas & Odera, Michael M. & Neven, David, 2006. "Horticulture Farmers and Domestic Supermarkets in Kenya," Staff Papers 11534, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  2. Dries, Liesbeth & Swinnen, Johan F. M., 2004. "Foreign Direct Investment, Vertical Integration, and Local Suppliers: Evidence from the Polish Dairy Sector," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1525-1544, September.
  3. Coulter, J. & Onumah, G., 2002. "The role of warehouse receipt systems in enhanced commodity marketing and rural livelihoods in Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 319-337, August.
  4. C. Dolan & J. Humphrey, 2000. "Governance and Trade in Fresh Vegetables: The Impact of UK Supermarkets on the African Horticulture Industry," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 147-176.
  5. Key, Nigel & Runsten, David, 1999. "Contract Farming, Smallholders, and Rural Development in Latin America: The Organization of Agroprocessing Firms and the Scale of Outgrower Production," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 381-401, February.
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