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Asymmetric Trade Costs: Agricultural Trade among Developing and Developed Countries

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  • Eum, Jihyun
  • Sheldon, Ian
  • Thompson, Stanley

Abstract

In this article, the reasons why developing countries trade fewer agricultural products than developed countries are analyzed. Based on earlier findings that low trade volume in the agricultural sector is due to high trade costs, the focus is on evaluating the extent to which bilateral trade costs in the agricultural sector differ among trading partners. Using a neo-Ricardian trade model, the results show that systematically, asymmetric bilateral trade costs and variation in the level of agricultural productivity across all countries in the sample, are the main barriers to developing countries’ agricultural exports. In addition, low-income countries face higher trade costs to export than do high-income countries.
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Suggested Citation

  • Eum, Jihyun & Sheldon, Ian & Thompson, Stanley, 2017. "Asymmetric Trade Costs: Agricultural Trade among Developing and Developed Countries," 2017: Globalization Adrift, December 3-5, 2017, Washington, D.C. 266814, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iats16:266814
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.266814
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Simonovska, Ina & Waugh, Michael E., 2014. "The elasticity of trade: Estimates and evidence," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 34-50.
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    3. Arnaud Costinot & Dave Donaldson & Ivana Komunjer, 2012. "What Goods Do Countries Trade? A Quantitative Exploration of Ricardo's Ideas," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(2), pages 581-608.
    4. Restuccia, Diego & Yang, Dennis Tao & Zhu, Xiaodong, 2008. "Agriculture and aggregate productivity: A quantitative cross-country analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 234-250, March.
    5. Simonovska, Ina & Waugh, Michael E., 2014. "The elasticity of trade: Estimates and evidence," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 34-50.
    6. World Bank, 2016. "World Development Indicators 2016," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 23969, December.
    7. Dornbusch, Rudiger & Fischer, Stanley & Samuelson, Paul A, 1977. "Comparative Advantage, Trade, and Payments in a Ricardian Model with a Continuum of Goods," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(5), pages 823-839, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ian M. Sheldon, 2021. "Reflections on a Career as an Industrial Organization and International Economist," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 43(2), pages 468-499, June.

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