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Modelling farmers’ choice of adaptation strategies towards climatic and weather variability: Empirical evidence from Chikhwawa district, Southern Malawi

  • Phiri, Innocent Pangapanga

This study analysed factors that influence household choice of adaptation strategies and examined the contribution of such strategies on crop production and household food security. The study collected data from 283 randomly selected households from 26 Villages of Chikhwawa district using a semi-structured questionnaire. Results show that irrigation farming, income-generating activities, crop diversification and shifting planting dates are some of the adaptation strategies in the study area. Empirical results from a Multinomial Probit Model indicate that flood, droughts, gender and education are important factors on influencing household choice of adaptation strategies. Climatic information, input markets and credit accessibility deterred households from adapting to climatic and weather variability. Based on the Normalized Translog Production and Tobit Models’ results, irrigation farming increased crop production and household food security by 80% and 21% in the study area, respectively. On the other hand, shifting planting dates reduce crop production and household food security by 50% and 9% in the study area, respectively. The study concludes that adaptation strategies have significant contribution on crop production and household food security in the study area. The study therefore advocates that projects should mainstream barriers and choice of adaptation strategies in the farming system.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/134489
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Paper provided by Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics in its series Research Theses with number 134489.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:ags:cmpart:134489
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.agriculturaleconomics.net

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  1. Bauer, Paul W., 1990. "Recent developments in the econometric estimation of frontiers," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1-2), pages 39-56.
  2. World Bank, 2010. "Economics of Adaptation to Climate Change : Synthesis Report," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12750, The World Bank.
  3. Langyintuo, Augustine S. & Mekuria, Mulugetta, 2008. "Assessing the influence of neighborhood effects on the adoption of improved agricultural technologies in developing agriculture," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 2(2), September.
  4. Maddison, David, 2007. "The perception of and adaptation to climate change in Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4308, The World Bank.
  5. Pauw, Karl & Thurlow, James & van Seventer, Dirk, 2010. "Droughts and floods in Malawi," IFPRI discussion papers 962, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Aigner, Dennis & Lovell, C. A. Knox & Schmidt, Peter, 1977. "Formulation and estimation of stochastic frontier production function models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 21-37, July.
  7. Darwin, Roy & Tsigas, Marinos E. & Lewandrowski, Jan & Raneses, Anton, 1995. "World Agriculture and Climate Change: Economic Adaptations," Agricultural Economics Reports 33933, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  8. Tchale, Hardwick & Sauer, Johannes, 2006. "Soil Fertility Management And Agricultural Productivity In Malawi," 46th Annual Conference, Giessen, Germany, October 4-6, 2006 14954, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
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