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Social capital and soil conservation: evidence from the Philippines


  • Cramb, Rob A.


The formation of social capital is hypothesised to enhance collective efforts for soil conservation. The Landcare Program in the Southern Philippines promotes simple conservation practices in upland environments by supporting community landcare groups and municipal landcare associations, thus augmenting social capital. A study was conducted in 2002 to evaluate the Landcare Program, using a mix of quantitative and qualitative techniques. In this paper the relationship between social capital formation and adoption of soil conservation is investigated. It is concluded that, although membership in a local landcare group was not a major factor in adoption, the Landcare Program as a whole created a valuable stock of bridging social capital, with significant benefits for long-term natural resource management.

Suggested Citation

  • Cramb, Rob A., 2004. "Social capital and soil conservation: evidence from the Philippines," 2004 Conference (48th), February 11-13, 2004, Melbourne, Australia 58398, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aare04:58398

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Cramb, R. A. & Garcia, J. N. M. & Gerrits, R. V. & Saguiguit, G. C., 2000. "Conservation Farming Projects in the Philippine Uplands: Rhetoric and Reality," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 911-927, May.
    2. Samuel Bowles & Herbert Gintis, 2002. "Social Capital and Community Governance," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 419-436, November.
    3. Uphoff, Norman, 1993. "Grassroots organizations and NGOs in rural development: Opportunities with diminishing states and expanding markets," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 607-622, April.
    4. Pretty, Jules & Ward, Hugh, 2001. "Social Capital and the Environment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 209-227, February.
    5. Baron, James N & Hannan, Michael T, 1994. "The Impact of Economics on Contemporary Sociology," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(3), pages 1111-1146, September.
    6. Woolcock, Michael & Narayan, Deepa, 2000. "Social Capital: Implications for Development Theory, Research, and Policy," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 15(2), pages 225-249, August.
    7. Duncan, Ronald C., 2003. "Agricultural and resource economics and economic development in Aboriginal communities," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 47(3), September.
    8. Ellis, Frank, 2000. "Rural Livelihoods and Diversity in Developing Countries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198296966, June.
    9. Edward L. Glaeser & David Laibson & Bruce Sacerdote, 2002. "An Economic Approach to Social Capital," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 437-458, November.
    10. Ron Duncan, 2003. "Agricultural and resource economics and economic development in Aboriginal communities," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 47(3), pages 307-324, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Obare, Gideon A. & Mwakubo, Samuel M. & Ouma, Emily Awuor & Mohammed, Lutta & Omiti, John M., 2004. "Social Capital and Soil Erosion Control in Agriculturally Marginal Areas of Kenya: The Case of Machakos and Taita-Taveta Districts," 2004 Inaugural Symposium, December 6-8, 2004, Nairobi, Kenya 9532, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).


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