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Social Capital, Creative Destruction and Economic Growth

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Abstract

A distinction between individual and communal aspects of social capital is introduced, and their roles in production explored. Contacts are required to transact. contact formation and replacement are mediated by either market institutions or, less efficiently, by informal networks. Replacement of contacts is part of Schumpeterian creative destruction, leading to technological progress but with a negative externality. For output to increase, a "fundamental transformation" from informal to formal contact creation institutions is required. This may be blocked if political elite interests are threatened by the externality. Growth experiences in transition and developing countries are interpreted in this frameword.

Suggested Citation

  • Uwe Dulleck & Dirk J. Bezemer & Paul Frijters, 2004. "Social Capital, Creative Destruction and Economic Growth," Vienna Economics Papers 0406, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:vie:viennp:0406
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Xiaowen Tian, 1999. "Market Orientation and Regional Economic Disparities in China," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 161-172.
    2. Paul Mosley & Marina Della Giusta, 1999. "A model of social capital and access to productive resources," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(7), pages 921-934.
    3. Dirk Bezemer & Uwe Dulleck & Paul Frijters, 2003. "Contacts, Social Capital and Market Institutions - A Theory of Development," Vienna Economics Papers 0311, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.
    4. Samuel Bowles & Herbert Gintis, 2002. "Social Capital and Community Governance," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 419-436, November.
    5. Larry H. P. Lang & Mara Faccio & Leslie Young, 2001. "Dividends and Expropriation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 54-78, March.
    6. Steven N. Durlauf, 2002. "On the Empirics of Social Capital," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 459-479, November.
    7. George A. Akerlof, 1970. "The Market for "Lemons": Quality Uncertainty and the Market Mechanism," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(3), pages 488-500.
    8. Edward L. Glaeser & David Laibson & Bruce Sacerdote, 2002. "An Economic Approach to Social Capital," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 437-458, November.
    9. Temple, Jonathan, 1998. "Initial Conditions, Social Capital and Growth in Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 7(3), pages 309-347, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bezemer, Dirk & Dulleck, Uwe & Frijters, Paul, 2005. "Social Capital, Creative Destruction and Economic Development," Research Report 05C09, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).
    2. Thomas Farole & Andres Rodriguez-Pose & Michael Storper, 2007. "Social capital, rules, and institutions: A cross-country investigation," Sciences Po publications 2007-12, Sciences Po.
    3. Knowles, Stephen, 2006. "Is Social Capital Part of the Institutions Continuum and is it a Deep Determinant of Development?," WIDER Working Paper Series 025, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. repec:dgr:rugsom:05c09 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Silvia London & Wiston Adrian Risso & Juan Gabriel Brida, 2008. "Human capital and innovation: a model of endogenous growth with a “skill-loss effect”," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 15(7), pages 1-10.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • P16 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Political Economy of Capitalism

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