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China’s Regional Agricultural Productivity Growth: Catching Up or Lagging Behind

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  • Wang, Sun Ling
  • Huang, Jikun
  • Wang, Xiaobing
  • Tuan, Francis

Abstract

In this study, we use a multilateral total factor productivity (TFP) panel data, spanning 1985-2011 period, to test the hypotheses of convergence to a single TFP level (σ convergence) or to a region-specific steady state TFP growth rate (β convergence) for China’s farm sector. Results show that there is no evidence of an overall σ convergence across all provinces. However, we find robust evidences of β convergence. Estimated rates of β convergence are conditional on how we capture the heterogeneity across regions. Overall, the rate of β convergence ranges from 0.016 to 0.028. Estimates also show that higher growth rate of education, R&D, capital/labor ratio, or intermediate goods/labor ratio can boost the rate of TFP growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Wang, Sun Ling & Huang, Jikun & Wang, Xiaobing & Tuan, Francis, 2016. "China’s Regional Agricultural Productivity Growth: Catching Up or Lagging Behind," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 235709, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea16:235709
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; International Development; Production Economics; Productivity Analysis; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies;

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