IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Public Works in Ethiopia. Crowding out on-farm labor?


  • Rodrigo, María F


This paper analyzes the impact of Public Works (PW) from the Productive Safety Net Program (PSNP) in the agricultural regions of Ethiopia. In particular, based on a household model with two inputs, I explore the effects of the program on capital and labor decisions using the Ethiopian Rural Household Surveys (ERHS) from 2004 and 2009. Results indicate that PW did not have an effect crowding out adult labor on- farm but it reduced child labor. Furthermore, after analyzing the relationship between capital and labor inputs, there is not evidence suggesting that the program had an effect on the demand of capital inputs (i.e., units of livestock and value of farming tools).

Suggested Citation

  • Rodrigo, María F, 2013. "Public Works in Ethiopia. Crowding out on-farm labor?," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150806, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea13:150806

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Daniel Gilligan & John Hoddinott & Alemayehu Seyoum Taffesse, 2009. "The Impact of Ethiopia's Productive Safety Net Programme and its Linkages," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(10), pages 1684-1706.
    2. Rashid, Shahidur & Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum, 2009. "Grain Markets and Large Social Transfers - An Analysis of Productive Safety Net Program in Ethiopia," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51764, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Coll-Black, Sarah & Gilligan, Daniel O. & Hoddinott, John F. & Kumar, Neha & Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum & Wiseman, William, 2011. "Targeting food security interventions when “everyone is poor”: The case of Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Programme," ESSP working papers 24, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Bogale, Ayalneh & Genene, Wubshet, 2012. "Impact of Productive Safety Net Financed Livestock Credit on Food Security and Poverty Status of Rural Households in Ethiopia: A Simulation Approach," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126157, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Andersson, Camilla & Mekonnen, Alemu & Stage, Jesper, 2011. "Impacts of the Productive Safety Net Program in Ethiopia on livestock and tree holdings of rural households," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 119-126, January.
    6. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Yohannes, Yisehac, 2005. "How fair is workfare? gender, public works, and employment in rural Ethiopia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3492, The World Bank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    Farm Management; International Relations/Trade; Labor and Human Capital; Public Economics;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aaea13:150806. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.