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How much of the error term is explained by psychometric variables? The example of organic produce demand

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  • Grebitus, Carola
  • Dumortier, Jerome

Abstract

This paper analyzes the impact of human values and personality on the demand for organic tomatoes applying open-ended choice experiments to data from an online study that was performed in summer 2012. Results show that consumers make a distinction between conventional and organic produce, such that human values have a differential impact with regard to predicting demand for products associated with organic labels. Also, consumers distinguish between conventional and organic produce, such that personality has a differential impact with regard to predicting demand for products associated with organic labels. However, results are not as strong as for human values. Overall, results indicate that human values and personality are able to explain a portion of the variability of demand for organic tomatoes.

Suggested Citation

  • Grebitus, Carola & Dumortier, Jerome, 2013. "How much of the error term is explained by psychometric variables? The example of organic produce demand," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150193, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea13:150193
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/150193/files/2013_AAEA%20Grebitus%20and%20Dumortier.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gil, Jose Maria & Gracia, Azucena & Sanchez Garcia, Mercedes, 2000. "Market Segmentation And Willingness To Pay For Organic Products In Spain," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association, vol. 0(Issue 2), pages 1-20.
    2. Grebitus, Carola & Lusk, Jayson L. & Nayga, Rodolfo M., 2013. "Explaining differences in real and hypothetical experimental auctions and choice experiments with personality," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 11-26.
    3. Grebitus, Carola & Yue, Chengyan & Jensen, Helen H., 2012. "Perceived quality on organic and conventional pork consumption," Staff General Research Papers Archive 36007, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    4. Jay R. Corrigan & Dinah Pura T. Depositario & Rodolfo M. Nayga & Ximing Wu & Tiffany P. Laude, 2006. "Comparing Open-Ended Choice Experiments and Experimental Auctions: An Application to Golden Rice," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(3), pages 837-853.
    5. Smith, Travis A. & Huang, Chung L. & Lin, Biing-Hwan, 2009. "Does Price or Income Affect Organic Choice? Analysis of U.S. Fresh Produce Users," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 41(03), pages 731-744, December.
    6. Almlund, Mathilde & Duckworth, Angela Lee & Heckman, James & Kautz, Tim, 2011. "Personality Psychology and Economics," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    7. Carola Grebitus & Bodo Steiner & Michele Veeman, 2013. "Personal Values and Decision Making: Evidence from Environmental Footprint Labeling in Canada," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 95(2), pages 397-403.
    8. Caprara, Gian Vittorio & Barbaranelli, Claudio & Guido, Gianluigi, 2001. "Brand personality: How to make the metaphor fit?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 377-395, June.
    9. Gracia, Azucena & de Magistris, Tiziana, 2008. "The demand for organic foods in the South of Italy: A discrete choice model," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 386-396, October.
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    Keywords

    Consumer/Household Economics; Crop Production/Industries; Demand and Price Analysis;

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