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Comparing Perceptions of Biotechnology in Fresh versus Processed Foods: A Cross-Cultural Study

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  • Kim, Hyeyoung
  • House, Lisa

Abstract

This study focused on investigating how respondents’ perceptions of biotechnology used in food production differs depending on the level of product transformation (i.e. fresh versus processed food). Using cluster analysis, respondents were clustered into two groups, genetically engineered (GE) tolerant and GE sensitive, based on changes in their perceptions about fresh apples and apple juice produced with and without biotechnology. Comparisons of respondents from six countries were performed to measure relative attitudes about biotech food. In addition, three types of positive information about biotechnology were tested in order to determine what types of information influences respondents’ GE tolerance. Results indicate that respondents were less likely to change their initial health perception for apple juice than for fresh apples when produced from trees that were genetically modified. The residency effect was strong and heterogeneous: respondents of Japan were much more sensitive than respondents of Spain and the United States.

Suggested Citation

  • Kim, Hyeyoung & House, Lisa, 2013. "Comparing Perceptions of Biotechnology in Fresh versus Processed Foods: A Cross-Cultural Study," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 149733, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea13:149733
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/149733
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jayson L. Lusk & W. Bruce Traill & Lisa O. House & Carlotta Valli & Sara R. Jaeger & Melissa Moore & Bert Morrow, 2006. "Comparative Advantage in Demand: Experimental Evidence of Preferences for Genetically Modified Food in the United States and European Union," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(1), pages 1-21, March.
    2. McCluskey, Jill J. & Grimsrud, Kristine M. & Ouchi, Hiromi & Wahl, Thomas I., 2003. "Consumer Response to Genetically Modified Food Products in Japan," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(02), pages 222-231, October.
    3. Lusk, Jayson L. & Jamal, Mustafa & Kurlander, Lauren & Roucan, Maud & Taulman, Lesley, 2005. "A Meta-Analysis of Genetically Modified Food Valuation Studies," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 30(01), April.
    4. Baker, Gregory A. & Burnham, Thomas A., 2001. "Consumer Response To Genetically Modified Foods: Market Segment Analysis And Implications For Producers And Policy Makers," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(02), December.
    5. House, Lisa & Lusk, Jayson L. & Jaeger, Sara & Traill, W. Bruce & Moore, Melissa & Valli, Carlotta & Morrow, Bert & Yee, Wallace M.S., 2004. "Objective And Subjective Knowledge: Impacts On Consumer Demand For Genetically Modified Foods In The United States And The European Union," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20125, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    6. Matthew Rousu & Wallace E. Huffman & Jason F. Shogren & Abebayehu Tegene, 2007. "Effects And Value Of Verifiable Information In A Controversial Market: Evidence From Lab Auctions Of Genetically Modified Food," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(3), pages 409-432, July.
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