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Structural Changes in Chinese Food Preferences

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  • Hovhannisyan, Vardges
  • Gould, Brian W.

Abstract

The article tests for structural food preference change in urban China using province-level panel data from 2002 to 2010. We employ the Generalized Quadratic Almost Ideal Demand System to represent consumer preferences and estimate demand for seven food groups in a dynamic setting. This relaxes many of the restrictions on the demand models used in the literature on structural preference change. Our findings suggest that Chinese food preferences are continuing to evolve.

Suggested Citation

  • Hovhannisyan, Vardges & Gould, Brian W., 2012. "Structural Changes in Chinese Food Preferences," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 125978, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea12:125978
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/125978
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Giancarlo Moschini & Karl D. Meilke, 1989. "Modeling the Pattern of Structural Change in U.S. Meat Demand," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 71(2), pages 253-261.
    2. Varian, Hal R, 1982. "The Nonparametric Approach to Demand Analysis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 945-973, July.
    3. Okrent, Abigail M. & Alston, Julian M., 2011. "Demand for Food in the United States: A Review of Literature, Evaluation of Previous Estimates, and Presentation of New Estimates of Demand," Monographs, University of California, Davis, Giannini Foundation, number 251908.
    4. Vardges Hovhannisyan & Brian W. Gould, 2011. "Quantifying the structure of food demand in China: An econometric approach," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 42, pages 1-18, November.
    5. Hengyun Ma & Jikun Huang & Frank Fuller & Scott Rozelle, 2006. "Getting Rich and Eating Out: Consumption of Food Away from Home in Urban China," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 54(1), pages 101-119, March.
    6. Alston, Julian M. & Chalfant, James A., 1992. "Consumer Demand Analysis According To Garp," Northeastern Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 21(2), October.
    7. James Banks & Richard Blundell & Arthur Lewbel, 1997. "Quadratic Engel Curves And Consumer Demand," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(4), pages 527-539, November.
    8. Okrent, Abigail M. & Alston, Julian M., 2010. "The Demand for Food in the United States: A Review of the Literature, Evaluation of Previous Estimates, and Presentation of New Estimates of Demand," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 61674, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
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    10. Blanciforti, Laura Ann & Green, Richard D. & King, Gordon A., 1986. "U.S. Consumer Behavior over the Postwar Period: An Almost Ideal Demand System Analysis," Monographs, University of California, Davis, Giannini Foundation, number 11939.
    11. Berndt, Ernst R & Savin, N Eugene, 1975. "Estimation and Hypothesis Testing in Singular Equation Systems with Autoregressive Disturbances," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 43(5-6), pages 937-957, Sept.-Nov.
    12. Tonsor, Glynn T. & Marsh, Thomas L., 2005. "Comparing Heterogeneous Consumption in US and Japanese Meat and Fish Demand," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19567, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    13. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-326, June.
    14. Ohtani, Kazuhiro & Katayama, Sei-ichi, 1986. "A gradual switching regression model with autocorrelated errors," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 169-172.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Food preference; structural change; dynamic GQAIDS model; food demand in China.; Consumer/Household Economics; Demand and Price Analysis; D12;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis

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