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U.S. Consumer Behavior over the Postwar Period: An Almost Ideal Demand System Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Blanciforti, Laura Ann
  • Green, Richard D.
  • King, Gordon A.

Abstract

This study analyzes U.S. consumer budget allocations among 11 aggregate commodity groups for the period 1948-78. Also budget allocations among four food groups are analyzed for this same period. Several alternative model specifications are analyzed. Emphasis is given to the Deaton-Muellbauer (1980a) "almost ideal demand system." A dynamic version of their model is developed and quantified. Comparison of the static and dynamic formulations are compared with similar specifications for the "linear expenditure system." The predictive performance of these four models for the 11 commodity groups is tested for the sample period (1948-78) and for the years 1979-81. The purpose of this study was to develop improved methods for analyzing demand relationships for food and other goods. The results for the dynamic or habit formation specifications appear promising, although no completely satisfactory results for all goods are claimed.

Suggested Citation

  • Blanciforti, Laura Ann & Green, Richard D. & King, Gordon A., 1986. "U.S. Consumer Behavior over the Postwar Period: An Almost Ideal Demand System Analysis," Monographs, University of California, Davis, Giannini Foundation, number 11939.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:dgiamo:11939
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/11939
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sangho Choo & Taihyeong Lee & Patricia L. Mokhtarian, 2007. "Relationships Between US Consumer Expenditures on Communications and Transportation Using Almost Ideal Demand System Modeling: 1984--2002," Transportation Planning and Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(5), pages 431-453, July.
    2. Lichtenberg, Erik & Strand, Ivar E., Jr., 2000. "Joint Adoption Of Multiple Technologies: A Dual, Latent Demand Approach," Working Papers 28566, University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    3. repec:ags:usao13:148045 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Catherine Durham & James Eales, 2010. "Demand elasticities for fresh fruit at the retail level," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(11), pages 1345-1354.
    5. De Zhou & Xiaohua Yu & Thomas Herzfeld, 2015. "Dynamic food demand in urban China," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 7(1), pages 27-44, February.
    6. Jing Cao, Mun S. Ho, and Huifang Liang, 2016. "Household energy demand in Urban China: Accounting for regional prices and rapid income change," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(China Spe).
    7. Anastasios Xepapadeas & Hassini Habib, 1995. "An almost ideal demand system with autoregressive disturbances for dairy products in Greece," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(6), pages 169-173.
    8. Sulistyaningrum, Eny, 2016. "Household Food Demand in Response to Earthquake: A Linear Approximate Almost Ideal Demand System Approach," 90th Annual Conference, April 4-6, 2016, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 236334, Agricultural Economics Society.
    9. Chambers, Robert G. & Pope, Rulon D., 1991. "Engel's Law and Linear in Moments Aggregation," Working Papers 197757, University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    10. repec:bla:jageco:v:68:y:2017:i:2:p:386-406 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Hovhannisyan, Vardges & Bozic, Marin, 2014. "On Price Endogeneity in the Analysis of Food Demand in China," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 169767, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    12. Pablo del Río & Desiderio Romero & Marta Jorge & Mercedes Burguillo, 2012. "Territorial differences for transport fuel demand in Spain: an econometric study," Chapters,in: Green Taxation and Environmental Sustainability, chapter 4, pages 56-68 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    13. Hovhannisyan, Vardges & Gould, Brian W., 2012. "Structural Changes in Chinese Food Preferences," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 125978, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    14. Kim, Chiho, 1987. "The demand for domestic services, capital services, wife's home time, and other inputs: an econometric analysis of technical and other changes affecting U.S. households, 1900-1985," ISU General Staff Papers 1987010108000012697, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    15. Ahn, Hyungdo, 1989. "Meat demand in Korea," ISU General Staff Papers 1989010108000017565, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    16. Kesavan, Thulasiram, 1988. "Monte Carlo experiments of market demand theory," ISU General Staff Papers 198801010800009854, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    17. Romero-Jordán, Desiderio & del Río, Pablo & Jorge-García, Marta & Burguillo, Mercedes, 2010. "Price and income elasticities of demand for passenger transport fuels in Spain. Implications for public policies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 3898-3909, August.
    18. Richard Tiffin & Kelvin Balcombe, 2005. "Testing Symmetry and Homogeneity in the Almost Ideal Demand System with Co-integrated Data using Fully Modified Estimation and the Bootstrap," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(2), pages 253-270.
    19. repec:taf:ragrxx:v:56:y:2017:i:1:p:13-27 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Stathis Klonaris & David Hallam, 2003. "Conditional and unconditional food demand elasticities in a dynamic multistage demand system," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(5), pages 503-514.
    21. Choo, Sangho & Lee, Taihyeong & Mokhtarian, Patricia L, 2006. "Relationships between U.S. Consumer Expenditures on Communications and Travel: 1984-2002," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt1gm08532, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    22. repec:pid:journl:v:55:y:2016:i:4:p:921-943 is not listed on IDEAS
    23. David Edgerton & Ghazi Shukur, 1996. "Some questions concerning dynamic almost ideal demand systems," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(11), pages 693-695.
    24. Kenneth Hanson & Adam Rose, 1997. "Factor productivity and income inequality: a general equilibrium analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(8), pages 1061-1071.
    25. Hovhannisyan, Vardges & Bozic, Marin, 2013. "On Price Endogeneity in the Analysis of Food Demand in China," Staff Papers 159771, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.

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