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Agricultural Productivity, Technological Change, and Deforestation: A Global Analysis

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  • Brady, Michael P.
  • Sohngen, Brent

Abstract

This study takes advantages of recent developments in measuring total factor productivity in output specific directions to examine the influence of technological change in different agricultural sectors on land-use decisions in a cross-section of countries from 1969 to 2001. Results demonstrate a positive relationship between productivity and land in agriculture in most cases. The ruminant sector is an exception where an increase in productivity was negatively associated with amount of pastureland. The analysis also includes variables that have been found to be important determinants in other studies of land-use change. Population is clearly the dominant factor over the time period analyzed, although it is argued that other factors are likely to become more important in upcoming years since population growth has slowed significantly in many countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Brady, Michael P. & Sohngen, Brent, 2008. "Agricultural Productivity, Technological Change, and Deforestation: A Global Analysis," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6420, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea08:6420
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/6420
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kormendi, Roger C. & Meguire, Philip G., 1985. "Macroeconomic determinants of growth: Cross-country evidence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 141-163, September.
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    3. Diego Restuccia, 2004. "Barriers to Capital Accumulation and Aggregate Total Factor Productivity," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(1), pages 225-238, February.
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    5. Robert T. Deacon & Henning Bohn, 2000. "Ownership Risk, Investment, and the Use of Natural Resources," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 526-549, June.
    6. Channing Arndt & Thomas W. Hertel & Paul V. Preckel, 2003. "Bridging the Gap between Partial and Total Factor Productivity Measures Using Directional Distance Functions," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(4), pages 928-942.
    7. Barbier, Edward B. & Burgess, J.C., 1996. "Economic analysis of deforestation in Mexico," MPRA Paper 12089, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Hayami, Yujiro & Ruttan, Vernon W, 1970. "Agricultural Productivity Differences Among Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(5), pages 895-911, December.
    9. Barbier, E B & Burgess, J C, 2001. " The Economics of Tropical Deforestation," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(3), pages 413-433, July.
    10. Chambers, Robert G. & Chung, Yangho & Fare, Rolf, 1996. "Benefit and Distance Functions," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 407-419, August.
    11. Koop, Gary & Tole, Lise, 1999. "Is there an environmental Kuznets curve for deforestation?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 231-244, February.
    12. Nadiri, M Ishaq, 1970. "Some Approaches to the Theory and Measurement of Total Factor Productivity: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 1137-1177, December.
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    Keywords

    Productivity Analysis; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies;

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