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Neither the elite, nor the mass. The rise of intermediate human capital during the French industrialization process

Author

Listed:
  • Claude Diebolt

    (BETA, University of Strasbourg Strasbourg, France)

  • Charlotte Le Chapelain

    (CLHDPP-BETA, University of Lyon 3, Lyon, France)

  • Audrey Rose Menard

    (Laboratoire d’Economie et de Management Nord-Atlantique, Nantes, France)

Abstract

This paper investigates the development of intermediate human capital in nineteenth century France. We perform panel and cross-section regression analyses to compare the effect of technological change on basic vs. intermediate human capital accumulation. Our contribution reveals that a shift in the kind of skills required occurred in the second half of the nineteenth century. We show that steam technology adoption was conducive to the accumulation of intermediate human capital in the second half of the nineteenth century.
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Suggested Citation

  • Claude Diebolt & Charlotte Le Chapelain & Audrey Rose Menard, 2019. "Neither the elite, nor the mass. The rise of intermediate human capital during the French industrialization process," Working Papers 04-19, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
  • Handle: RePEc:afc:wpaper:04-19
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Adrien Montalbo, 2020. "Education supply and economic growth in nineteenth-century France," Working Papers halshs-02482643, HAL.
    2. Adrien Montalbo, 2022. "Primary education and economic growth in nineteenth-century France," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 16(2), pages 277-332, May.
    3. Giovanni Federico & Alessandro Nuvolari & Leonardo Ridolfi & Michelangelo Vasta, 2021. "The race between the snail and the tortoise: skill premium and early industrialization in Italy (1861–1913)," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 15(1), pages 1-42, January.
    4. Montalbo, Adrien, 2021. "Schools without a law: Primary education in France from the Revolution to the Guizot Law," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 79(C).
    5. Adrien Montalbo, 2020. "Education supply and economic growth in nineteenth-century France," PSE Working Papers halshs-02482643, HAL.
    6. Pau Insa-Sánchez, 2021. "Inequality of Opportunity in Access to Secondary Education in 19th Century," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 2106, Asociación Española de Historia Económica.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • N13 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • N33 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • N73 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • N93 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - Europe: Pre-1913

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