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How Does the Oil Price Shock Affect Consumers?

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  • Liping Gao
  • Hyeongwoo Kim
  • Richard Saba

Abstract

Edelstein and Kilian (2009) point out that the oil price shock involves a reduction in consumer spending, which results in a decrease in the demand for goods and services. This paper empirically evaluates this argument by empirically investigating effects of the oil price shock on six CPI sub-indices in the US. We find substantial decreases in the relative price in less energy-intensive sectors, but not in energy-intensive sectors. Our findings are consistent with those of Edelstein and Kilian (2009) in the sense that spending adjustments play an important role in price dynamics.

Suggested Citation

  • Liping Gao & Hyeongwoo Kim & Richard Saba, 2013. "How Does the Oil Price Shock Affect Consumers?," Auburn Economics Working Paper Series auwp2013-04, Department of Economics, Auburn University.
  • Handle: RePEc:abn:wpaper:auwp2013-04
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    File URL: https://cla.auburn.edu/econwp/Archives/2013/2013-04.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pesaran, H. Hashem & Shin, Yongcheol, 1998. "Generalized impulse response analysis in linear multivariate models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 17-29, January.
    2. Zhang, Dayong, 2008. "Oil shock and economic growth in Japan: A nonlinear approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2374-2390, September.
    3. Hyeongwoo Kim, 2013. "Generalized impulse response analysis: General or Extreme?," EconoQuantum, Revista de Economia y Negocios, Universidad de Guadalajara, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Economico Administrativas, Departamento de Metodos Cuantitativos y Maestria en Economia., vol. 10(2), pages 135-141, Julio - D.
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    7. Edelstein, Paul & Kilian, Lutz, 2009. "How sensitive are consumer expenditures to retail energy prices?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(6), pages 766-779, September.
    8. Darby, Michael R, 1982. "The Price of Oil and World Inflation and Recession," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(4), pages 738-751, September.
    9. Peter Ferderer, J., 1996. "Oil price volatility and the macroeconomy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 1-26.
    10. Lutz Kilian & Logan T. Lewis, 2011. "Does the Fed Respond to Oil Price Shocks?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(555), pages 1047-1072, September.
    11. Cologni, Alessandro & Manera, Matteo, 2008. "Oil prices, inflation and interest rates in a structural cointegrated VAR model for the G-7 countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 856-888, May.
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    13. Gisser, Micha & Goodwin, Thomas H, 1986. "Crude Oil and the Macroeconomy: Tests of Some Popular Notions: A Note," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 18(1), pages 95-103, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Baas, Timo & Belke, Ansgar, 2017. "Oil price shocks, monetary policy and current account imbalances within a currency union," CEPS Papers 13334, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:4:p:1080-:d:139614 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Carlos Medel, 2015. "Fuelling Future Prices: Oil Price and Global Inflation," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 770, Central Bank of Chile.
    4. repec:eco:journ2:2017-06-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:energy:v:130:y:2017:i:c:p:204-217 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Sam Olofin & Afees A. Salisu, 2017. "Modelling oil price-inflation nexus: The role of asymmetries and structural breaks," Working Papers 020, Centre for Econometric and Allied Research, University of Ibadan.
    7. Jiranyakul, Komain, 2015. "Oil price shocks and domestic inflation in Thailand," MPRA Paper 62797, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Cristina Conflitti & Matteo Luciani, 2017. "Oil Price Pass-Through into Core Inflation," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-085, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
    9. Abdulaziz Hamad Algaeed, 2017. "The Effects of Asymmetric Oil Price Shocks on the Saudi Consumption: An Empirical Investigation," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 7(1), pages 99-107.
    10. Razmi, Fatemeh & Azali, M. & Chin, Lee & Shah Habibullah, Muzafar, 2016. "The role of monetary transmission channels in transmitting oil price shocks to prices in ASEAN-4 countries during pre- and post-global financial crisis," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 581-591.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Oil Price Shocks; Pass-Through Effect; Consumer Price Sub-Index; Consumption Expenditures; Income Effect;

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

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