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Reciprocal liberalization: Bilateral, plurilateral or multilateral?

Author

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  • Pedro J. Martinez Edo

    () (Research Assistant, ARTNeT, and Masters Degree Candidate, International Economics Institute, University of Valencia, Spain)

Abstract

This chapter studies interlinkages and interaction between the reciprocal trade liberalization through the WTO and preferential trade agreements from the perspective of the LDCs. An econometric exercise using an extended version of ARTNeT gravity dataset is done to determine the impact of WTO and PTA membership on the developed and developing countries, as well as LDCs’ trade.

Suggested Citation

  • Pedro J. Martinez Edo, 2011. "Reciprocal liberalization: Bilateral, plurilateral or multilateral?," STUDIES IN TRADE AND INVESTMENT, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP).
  • Handle: RePEc:unt:ecchap:tipub2625_chap4
    as

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    File URL: http://www.unescap.org/tid/publication/tipub2625-chap4.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Maria Cipollina & Luca Salvatici, 2010. "Reciprocal Trade Agreements in Gravity Models: A Meta-Analysis," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(1), pages 63-80, February.
    2. Goldin, Claudia, 1989. "Life-Cycle Labor-Force Participation of Married Women: Historical Evidence and Implications," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 7(1), pages 20-47, January.
    3. Céline CARRERE, 2003. "Revisiting the Effects of Regional Trading Agreements on trade flows with Proper Specification of the Gravity Model," Working Papers 200310, CERDI.
    4. Caroline Freund & Emanuel Ornelas, 2010. "Regional Trade Agreements," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 2(1), pages 139-166, September.
    5. Baldwin, Richard & Jaimovich, Dany, 2012. "Are Free Trade Agreements contagious?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 1-16.
    6. Juan Ruiz & Josep M. Vilarrubia, 2007. "The wise use of dummies in gravity models: export potentials in the Euromed region," Working Papers 0720, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    7. Mary Amiti & John Romalis, 2007. "Will the Doha Round Lead to Preference Erosion?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 54(2), pages 338-384, June.
    8. Emanuel Ornelas, 2005. "Rent Destruction and the Political Viability of Free Trade Agreements," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(4), pages 1475-1506.
    9. E. Baldwin, Richard & Seghezza, Elena, 2010. "Are Trade Blocs Building or Stumbling Blocs?," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 25, pages 276-297.
    10. Kemp, Murray C. & Wan, Henry Jr., 1976. "An elementary proposition concerning the formation of customs unions," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 95-97, February.
    11. Tovar, Patricia, 2012. "Preferential Trade Agreements and Unilateral Liberalization: Evidence from CAFTA," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(04), pages 591-619, October.
    12. Lim O, Nuno, 2006. "Preferential vs. multilateral trade liberalization: evidence and open questions," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(02), pages 155-176, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Doha Round; trade; least developed countries; Aid for Trade; gravity; WTO; Asia-Pacific; preferential trade agreements; trade liberalization;

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade

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