IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/h/nbr/nberch/9589.html
   My bibliography  Save this book chapter

Globalization and Convergence

In: Globalization in Historical Perspective

Author

Listed:
  • Steve Dowrick
  • J. Bradford DeLong

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Steve Dowrick & J. Bradford DeLong, 2003. "Globalization and Convergence," NBER Chapters,in: Globalization in Historical Perspective, pages 191-226 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:9589
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c9589.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116.
    2. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew Warner, 1995. "Economic Reform and the Process of Global Integration," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 26(1, 25th A), pages 1-118.
    3. Robert Summers & Alan Heston, 1991. "The Penn World Table (Mark 5): An Expanded Set of International Comparisons, 1950–1988," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 327-368.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Branko Milanovic, 2005. "Global Income Inequality: What It Is And Why It Matters?," HEW 0512001, EconWPA.
    2. Karaman, Filiz & Aydogan, E. Tomris & Geyikdagi, V. Necla, 2015. "Economic Convergence: A Panel Analysis of Growth Variables in Selected Asian and Latin American Countries - Convergenza economica: un’analisi panel di variabili di crescita in una selezione di paesi a," Economia Internazionale / International Economics, Camera di Commercio Industria Artigianato Agricoltura di Genova, vol. 68(3), pages 385-400.
    3. Carolina Castaldi & Giovanni Dosi, 2008. "Technical Change and Economic Growth: Some Lessons from Secular Patterns and Some Conjectures on the Current Impact of ICT Technology," LEM Papers Series 2008/01, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    4. Boris CHISTRUGA & Rodica CRUDU, 2011. "Economic Disparity and Global Governance Failures – the Most Important Risks in the Coming Decade," Risk in Contemporary Economy, "Dunarea de Jos" University of Galati, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, pages 18-25.
    5. Michelle Baddeley, 2006. "Convergence or Divergence? The Impacts of Globalisation on Growth and Inequality in Less Developed Countries," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 391-410.
    6. Nissanke, Machiko & Thorbecke, Erik, 2006. "A Quest for Pro-Poor Globalization," WIDER Working Paper Series 046, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Carolina Castaldi & Giovanni Dosi, 2010. "Technical Change and Economic Growth: Some Lessons from Secular Patterns and Some Conjectures on the Current Impact of ICT," Chapters,in: Innovation and Economic Development, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Machiko, Nissanke, 2011. "International and Institutional Traps in Sub-Saharan Africa under Globalisation: A Comparative Perspective," CEI Working Paper Series 2011-6, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    9. Nissanke, Machiko & Thorbecke, Erik, 2005. "Channels and Policy Debate in the Globalization-Inequality-Poverty Nexus," WIDER Working Paper Series DP2005/08, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:9589. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: () or (Joanne Lustig). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.