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Why Does China Attract So Little Foreign Direct Investment?

In: The Role of Foreign Direct Investment in East Asian Economic Development, NBER-EASE Volume 9

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  • Shang-Jin Wei

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  • Shang-Jin Wei, 2000. "Why Does China Attract So Little Foreign Direct Investment?," NBER Chapters,in: The Role of Foreign Direct Investment in East Asian Economic Development, NBER-EASE Volume 9, pages 239-265 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8501
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Frankel, Jeffrey A. & Rose, Andrew K., 1996. "Currency Crashes in Emerging Markets: Empirical Indicators," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers 233424, University of California-Berkeley, Department of Economics.
    2. Jonathan Eaton & Akiko Tamura, 1996. "Japanese and U.S. Exports and Investment as Conduits of Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Financial Deregulation and Integration in East Asia, NBER-EASE Volume 5, pages 51-75 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Frankel, Jeffrey & Stein, Ernesto & Wei, Shang-jin, 1995. "Trading blocs and the Americas: The natural, the unnatural, and the super-natural," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 61-95, June.
    4. Frankel, Jeffrey A. & Rose, Andrew K., 1996. "Currency crashes in emerging markets: An empirical treatment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-4), pages 351-366, November.
    5. Shang-Jin Wei, 1996. "Foreign Direct Investment in China: Sources and Consequences," NBER Chapters,in: Financial Deregulation and Integration in East Asia, NBER-EASE Volume 5, pages 77-105 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Steven Radelet & Jeffrey Sachs, 1998. "The Onset of the East Asian Financial Crisis," NBER Working Papers 6680, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1994. "Politicians and Firms," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(4), pages 995-1025.
    8. Paolo Mauro, 1995. "Corruption and Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(3), pages 681-712.
    9. Steven Radelet & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 1998. "The East Asian Financial Crisis: Diagnosis, Remedies, Prospects," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 29(1), pages 1-90.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gao, Ting, 2005. "Foreign direct investment from developing Asia: some distinctive features," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 29-35, January.
    2. Shang-Jin Wei & Yi Wu, 2002. "Negative Alchemy? Corruption, Composition of Capital Flows, and Currency Crises," NBER Chapters,in: Preventing Currency Crises in Emerging Markets, pages 461-506 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Lee, Hsiu-Yun & Lin, Kenneth S. & Tsui, Hsiao-Chien, 2009. "Home country effects of foreign direct investment: From a small economy to a large economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 1121-1128, September.
    4. Li-Gang Liu, 2005. "China'S Role In The Current Global Economic Imbalance," Discussion papers 05010, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    5. Elissa Braunstein & Gerald Epstein, 2002. "Bargaining Power and Foreign Direct Investment in China: Can 1.3 Billion Consumers Tame the Multinationals?," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2002-13, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    6. Prema-chandra Athukorala, 2008. "Trade and Investment Patterns in Asia : Regionalisation or Globalisation?," EABER Working Papers 21794, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    7. Branstetter, Lee G. & Feenstra, Robert C., 2002. "Trade and foreign direct investment in China: a political economy approach," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 335-358, December.
    8. Bhaumik, Sumon Kumar & Co, Catherine Yap, 2011. "China's economic cooperation related investment: An investigation of its direction and some implications for outward investment," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 75-87, March.
    9. Andrew Powell & Dilip Ratha & Sanket Mohapatra, 2002. "Capital Inflows and Capital Outflows: Measurement, Determinants, Consequences," Business School Working Papers veinticinco, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella.

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