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Crime and Housing Prices

In: Handbook on the Economics of Crime

Author

Listed:
  • Keith Ihlanfeldt
  • Thomas Mayock

Abstract

While few economists analyzed criminal behaviour and the criminal justice process before Gary Becker’s seminal 1968 paper, an enormous body of economic research on crime has since been produced. This insightful and comprehensive Handbook reviews and extends much of this important resulting research.

Suggested Citation

  • Keith Ihlanfeldt & Thomas Mayock, 2010. "Crime and Housing Prices," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Crime, chapter 12 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:13180_12
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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781847209542.00021.xml
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eide, Erling & Rubin, Paul H. & Shepherd, Joanna M., 2006. "Economics of Crime," Foundations and Trends(R) in Microeconomics, now publishers, vol. 2(3), pages 205-279, December.
    2. Allen Lynch & David Rasmussen, 2001. "Measuring the impact of crime on house prices," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(15), pages 1981-1989.
    3. Steve Gibbons, 2004. "The Costs of Urban Property Crime," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(499), pages 441-463, November.
    4. Daryl A. Hellman & Joel L. Naroff, 1979. "The Impact of Crime on Urban Residential Property Values," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 16(1), pages 105-112, February.
    5. Bowes, David R. & Ihlanfeldt, Keith R., 2001. "Identifying the Impacts of Rail Transit Stations on Residential Property Values," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 1-25, July.
    6. Thaler, Richard, 1978. "A note on the value of crime control: Evidence from the property market," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 137-145, January.
    7. Pope, Carl E., 1980. "Patterns in burglary: An empirical examination of offense and offender characteristics," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 39-51.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell, 2015. "Crime victimization, neighborhood safety and happiness in China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 424-435.
    2. James Alm & Keith Finlay, 2013. "Who Benefits from Tax Evasion?," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 139-154, September.
    3. Sunday Emmanuel Olajide & Mohd Lizam, 2016. "Determining the Impact of Residential Neighbourhood Crime on Housing Investment Using Logistic Regression," Traektoriâ Nauki = Path of Science, Altezoro, s.r.o. & Dialog, vol. 2(12(17)), pages 6.8-6.6.17, December.

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