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Foreign exchange market intervention: methods and tactics

In: Foreign exchange market intervention in emerging markets: motives, techniques and implications

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  • David Archer

    (Bank for International Settlements)

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Suggested Citation

  • David Archer, 2005. "Foreign exchange market intervention: methods and tactics," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Foreign exchange market intervention in emerging markets: motives, techniques and implications, volume 24, pages 40-55 Bank for International Settlements.
  • Handle: RePEc:bis:bisbpc:24-04
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    File URL: http://www.bis.org/publ/bppdf/bispap24d.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin D.D. Evans & Richard K. Lyons, 2017. "Order Flow and Exchange Rate Dynamics," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Studies in Foreign Exchange Economics, chapter 6, pages 247-290 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    2. Scalia, Antonio, 2008. "Is foreign exchange intervention effective? Some microanalytical evidence from the Czech Republic," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 529-546, June.
    3. Charles Engel & Kenneth D. West, 2005. "Exchange Rates and Fundamentals," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(3), pages 485-517, June.
    4. Christopher J. Neely, 2001. "The practice of central bank intervention: looking under the hood," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 1-10.
    5. Jorge I Canales Kriljenko, 2003. "Foreign Exchange Intervention in Developing and Transition Economies; Results of a Survey," IMF Working Papers 03/95, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Hung, Juann H, 1997. "Intervention strategies and exchange rate volatility: a noise trading perspective," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 779-793, September.
    7. Domac, Ilker & Mendoza, Alfonso, 2004. "Is there room for foreign exchange interventions under an inflation targeting framework ? Evidence from Mexico and Turkey," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3288, The World Bank.
    8. Mark P. Taylor & Lucio Sarno, 2001. "Official Intervention in the Foreign Exchange Market: Is It Effective and, If So, How Does It Work?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(3), pages 839-868, September.
    9. Adam Gersl & Tomás Holub, 2006. "Foreign Exchange Interventions Under Inflation Targeting: The Czech Experience," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 24(4), pages 475-491, October.
    10. Martin D. D. Evans & Richard K. Lyons, 2017. "Informational Integration and FX Trading," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Studies in Foreign Exchange Economics, chapter 7, pages 291-324 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    11. Kathryn Dominguez & Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1990. "Does Foreign Exchange Intervention Work?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 16.
    12. Martin D. D. Evans & Richard K. Lyons, 2017. "How is Macro News Transmitted to Exchange Rates?," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Studies in Foreign Exchange Economics, chapter 14, pages 547-596 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    13. King, Michael R, 2003. "Effective Foreign Exchange Intervention: Matching Strategies with Objectives," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(2), pages 249-271, Summer.
    14. Woo, Wing Thye, 1987. "Some Evidence of Speculative Bubbles in the Foreign Exchange Markets," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 19(4), pages 499-514, November.
    15. corrinne ho & robert n mccauley, 2004. "Living with flexible exchange rates:," International Finance 0411003, EconWPA.
    16. Jorge I Canales Kriljenko & Cem Karacadag & Roberto Pereira Guimarães, 2003. "Official Intervention in the Foreign Exchange Market; Elements of Best Practice," IMF Working Papers 03/152, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Prates, Daniela Magalhães & Cunha, André Moreira & Lélis, Marcos Tadeo Caputi, 2009. "Exchange-rate management in Brazil," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), December.
    2. Sebastián Claro & Claudio Soto, 2013. "Exchange rate policy and exchange rate interventions: the Chilean experience," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Sovereign risk: a world without risk-free assets?, volume 73, pages 81-93 Bank for International Settlements.
    3. Scott Andrew Urban, 2009. "The Name of the Rose: Classifying 1930s Exchange-Rate Regimes," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _076, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    4. Scott Andrew Urban, 2009. "The Name of the Rose: Classifying 1930s Exchange-Rate Regimes," Economics Series Working Papers Paper 76, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    5. Leroi RAPUTSOANE, 2016. "Real Effective Exchange Rates Comovements and the South African Currency," Journal of Economics Library, KSP Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 57-68, March.
    6. Keefe, Helena Glebocki & Rengifo, Erick W., 2015. "Options and central bank currency market intervention: The case of Colombia," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 1-25.
    7. Eduardo Rosas Rojas, 2016. "La intervención cambiaria y los flujos de capital: evidencia empírica para Brasil, Colombia, Chile y México, 2001-2013," REVISTA FINANZAS Y POLÍTICA ECONÓMICA, UNIVERSIDAD CATOLICA DE COLOMBIA, vol. 8(1), pages 31-53, March.
    8. Capraro Rodríguez Santiago & Perrotini Hernández Ignacio, 2012. "Intervenciones cambiarias esterilizadas, teoría y evidencia:el caso de México," Contaduría y Administración, Accounting and Management, vol. 57(2), pages 11-44, abril-jun.
    9. Daniela Magalhães Prates & André Moreira Cunha & Marcos T. C. Lélis, 2008. "A gestão do regime de câmbio flutuante no Brasil," Anais do XXXVI Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 36th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 200807211144430, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    10. Helena Glebocki Keefe & Erick W. Rengifo, 2014. "Options and Central Banks Currency Market Intervention: The Case of Colombia," Fordham Economics Discussion Paper Series dp2014-06, Fordham University, Department of Economics.

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